Found 1357 Hypotheses across 136 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Average tool complexity will be higher in larger populations than in smaller populations (2561).Kline, Michelle A. - Population size predicts technological complexity in oceania, 2010 - 7 Variables

    The capacity for cumulative cultural evolution has often been invoked to explain the great diversity of habitats occupied by humans. This theory of cultural evolution emphasizes the gradual accumulation of technologies and cultural practices over many generations, and predicts that larger populations will generate more complex cultural adaptations than smaller, isolated ones. Here, the authors investigate the marine foraging tool repertoires of 10 Oceanic societies to determine whether population size and intergroup contact affect the cultural processes by which tool kits evolve.

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  2. Contact will have a stronger effect on the tool repertoires of small populations than large populations (2561).Kline, Michelle A. - Population size predicts technological complexity in oceania, 2010 - 8 Variables

    The capacity for cumulative cultural evolution has often been invoked to explain the great diversity of habitats occupied by humans. This theory of cultural evolution emphasizes the gradual accumulation of technologies and cultural practices over many generations, and predicts that larger populations will generate more complex cultural adaptations than smaller, isolated ones. Here, the authors investigate the marine foraging tool repertoires of 10 Oceanic societies to determine whether population size and intergroup contact affect the cultural processes by which tool kits evolve.

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  3. Technological complexity is positively associated with risk of resource failure (1).Collard, Mark - Risk, mobility or population size?: Drivers of technological richness among ..., 2013 - 6 Variables

    This paper builds off previous research into the effect of population size and resource risk on complexity of subsistence technology by investigating the relationship between these independent variables and total number of material items and techniques used by various western North American hunter-gatherer groups. This tally of total technological complexity is found to be insignificantly related to population size or residential mobility; however, there is a significant correlation in the expected direction between technological complexity and one measure of resource risk (mean annual temperature during driest month). Tying this finding to previous analyses of subsistence technologies, the authors theorize that environmental risk is a pervasive driver of technological ingenuity and cultural evolution.

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  4. Controlling for resource risk, population size will predict tool kit complexity (p. S390).Collard, Mark - Population size as an explanation for patterns in the paleolithic archaeolog..., 2013 - 3 Variables

    Previous studies have yielded contradictory results on the relationship between population size and cultural evolution. Focusing on tool complexity these authors introduce the risk of resource failure as a possible confounding variable. They conclude that population does not predict tool kit complexity when controlling on other factors. There were significant correlations between tool kit complexity and some of the resource measures.

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  5. Toolkit complexity and diversity will be positively associated with risk of resource failure (252).Collard, Mark - Niche construction and the toolkits of hunter–gatherers and food producers, 2011 - 4 Variables

    The researchers test the relationship between toolkit complexity and diversity as defined by Oswalt (1973) and environmental and demographic variables. Neither population size nor risk of resource failure predict toolkit characteristics among all groups in the sample. However, population size is significantly positively correlated with toolkit diversity and complexity among food-producers, whereas environmental factors indicating risk of resource failure are significantly positively correlated among hunter-gatherers. This leads the researchers to suggest that food-producers' effectiveness at niche construction is a result of their large population size, which thus has a larger effect on toolkit composition than does environmental risk relative to hunter-gatherers.

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  6. Using multivariate clustering, it is expected that patterns in human subsistence variability will be found that are consistent with the thery of "attractors" and "repellers." (9580)Ullah, Isaac I. T. - Toward a theory of punctuated subsistence change, 2015 - 6 Variables

    The authors use a comparative ethnoarchaeological model that seeks to test the applicability of Dynamical Systems Theory to modeling subsistence variation (namely the foraging-farming transition). The authors utilize the concepts of "attractors," which tend to stabilize a system, and "repellors," which tend to be destabilizing forces. Authors hope that this multidimensional approach, which assumes that several "controlling" variables disproportionately affect change within subsistence systems, will adequately model the nonlinearity and heterogeneity seen in the emergences of (and variations within) human subsistence systems throughout human history. Their model and premises regarding disproportionally-controlling variables appear to be supported.

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  7. Population size will be associated with toolkit richness and complexity independent of rain and effective temperature.Collard, Mark - Population size and cultural evolution in nonindustrial food-producing societies, 2013 - 2 Variables

    Seeking to resolve contradictions between previous studies, these authors conduct empirical analysis on the relationship between population size and cultural evolution. Results indicate that population size influences toolkit richness and complexity, even when proxies for risk of resource failure are introduced in the regression model. Authors speculate that the association is weaker for hunter-gatherers because those societies are more affected by risk of resource failure and have institutions that facilitate cultural evolution despite smaller population size. There also may be a threshold effect in the influence of population size on toolkit structure.

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  8. ". . . there should be a progression upward in mean community size from hunting-collecting, through fishing and herding, to agricultural communities . . ."Goodenough, Ward H. - Basic economy and community, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines relationships among mode of production, sedentarism, and population size. Generally, agricultural societies were found to be sedentary and have larger populations, while migratory societies (such as herders or hunters) had smaller population size.

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  9. Population size will have an influence on cultural complexity as measured by the number of narrative motifs in folk tales of magicAcerbi, Alberto - Cultural complexity and demography: The case of folktakes, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Acerbi, Kendal, and Tehrani examine the relationship between population size and cultural complexity as measured by a non-technological cultural domain: folktales. Three measures of complexity for folktales are analyzed, 1) number of tale types, 2) number of narrative motifs, and 3) number of traits in variants of two international folktales. Findings suggest that the relationship between cultural complexity and population may depend on the domain, as different domains vary in cultural maintenance and transmission.

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  10. Processing technology will be more highly developed (mechanized) under the same conditions in which agricultural technology is more intense (p.106).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 9 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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