Found 1594 Hypotheses across 160 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Tool repertoire size will be larger in large populations than in small populations (2561).Kline, Michelle A. - Population size predicts technological complexity in oceania, 2010 - 7 Variables

    The capacity for cumulative cultural evolution has often been invoked to explain the great diversity of habitats occupied by humans. This theory of cultural evolution emphasizes the gradual accumulation of technologies and cultural practices over many generations, and predicts that larger populations will generate more complex cultural adaptations than smaller, isolated ones. Here, the authors investigate the marine foraging tool repertoires of 10 Oceanic societies to determine whether population size and intergroup contact affect the cultural processes by which tool kits evolve.

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  2. Average tool complexity will be higher in larger populations than in smaller populations (2561).Kline, Michelle A. - Population size predicts technological complexity in oceania, 2010 - 7 Variables

    The capacity for cumulative cultural evolution has often been invoked to explain the great diversity of habitats occupied by humans. This theory of cultural evolution emphasizes the gradual accumulation of technologies and cultural practices over many generations, and predicts that larger populations will generate more complex cultural adaptations than smaller, isolated ones. Here, the authors investigate the marine foraging tool repertoires of 10 Oceanic societies to determine whether population size and intergroup contact affect the cultural processes by which tool kits evolve.

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  3. Technological complexity is positively associated with risk of resource failure (1).Collard, Mark - Risk, mobility or population size?: Drivers of technological richness among ..., 2013 - 6 Variables

    This paper builds off previous research into the effect of population size and resource risk on complexity of subsistence technology by investigating the relationship between these independent variables and total number of material items and techniques used by various western North American hunter-gatherer groups. This tally of total technological complexity is found to be insignificantly related to population size or residential mobility; however, there is a significant correlation in the expected direction between technological complexity and one measure of resource risk (mean annual temperature during driest month). Tying this finding to previous analyses of subsistence technologies, the authors theorize that environmental risk is a pervasive driver of technological ingenuity and cultural evolution.

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  4. Controlling for resource risk, population size will predict tool kit complexity (p. S390).Collard, Mark - Population size as an explanation for patterns in the paleolithic archaeolog..., 2013 - 3 Variables

    Previous studies have yielded contradictory results on the relationship between population size and cultural evolution. Focusing on tool complexity these authors introduce the risk of resource failure as a possible confounding variable. They conclude that population does not predict tool kit complexity when controlling on other factors. There were significant correlations between tool kit complexity and some of the resource measures.

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  5. Processing technology will be more highly developed (mechanized) under the same conditions in which agricultural technology is more intense (p.106).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 9 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  6. There will be a correlation between dry climates and resource stress.Ember, Carol R. - Climate Variability, Drought, and the Belief that High Gods Are Associated w..., 2021 - 6 Variables

    The authors of this study explore the relationship between climate variability and beliefs that high gods are associated with the weather. As predicted, they find significant correlations between these beliefs and dry climates. They then evaluate how these findings contribute to their previous understanding of resource stress and its association to beliefs in high gods.

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  7. Foraging economy type (Classic, transitional, human-wealth oriented, intangible-wealth oriented, politically oriented, and physical-wealth oriented) will be associated with various environmental attributes. (49)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  8. Classic foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes (47)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  9. Transitional foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes (49).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  10. HWO foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes. (48)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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