Found 1810 Hypotheses across 181 Pages (0.037 seconds)
  1. The major determinants of centric transfers of labor are the level of economic development and the size of the units of observation in the society (305).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 3 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  2. The presence of centric transfers is somewhat determined by the presence or absence of exchange modes of distribution of goods that facilitate the gathering of taxes (305).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  3. The presence of noncentric transfers of goods is positively related to the presence of great inequality of total work of spouses (276).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  4. The presence of centric transfers is related to high levels of economic development (304).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  5. Noncentric transfers of goods appear more frequently in societies at the lower end of the development scale (276).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  6. Reciprocal exchange of labor can be found in societies at much higher levels of economic development than the reciprocal exchange of goods (216).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  7. Reciprocal exchange of labor is more likely to occur at societies at low levels of economic development (215).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  8. The markets for labor and for credit emerge at roughly the same higher levels of economic development (148).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 3 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  9. The existence of labor, credit, land, and land rental markets are independent of the existence of a goods market (148).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  10. Reciprocal exchange is more probable in societies in which the unit of observation is relatively small (215).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

    Related HypothesesCite