Found 3202 Hypotheses across 321 Pages (0.038 seconds)
  1. Infant and child mortality rates will be higher among contemporary hunter-gatherer populations than in western, industrialized populations.Volk, Anthony A. - Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptation, 2013 - 2 Variables

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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  2. Agriculturalist populations will have lower infant and child mortality rates than hunter-gatherer populations.Volk, Anthony A. - Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptation, 2013 - 3 Variables

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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  3. The presence of grandmothers will predict lower child mortality rates (10).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 2 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  4. The effect of losing a mother has the strongest effect on child survival rate in very early life (5).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 2 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  5. "The higher the degree of military sophistication, the higher the casualty rates" (82)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  6. Maternal grandfathers will have a greater effect on child survival than paternal grandfathers (10).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 3 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  7. "The greater the percentage of professionals in the military organization, the higher the degree of subordination" (25)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  8. "The greater the percentage of professionals in the military organization, the more likely that shock weapons are used" (45)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  9. "The greater the percentage of professionals in the military organization, the more likely that body armor is used" (50)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  10. "The greater the percentage of professionals in the military organization, the more likely that field fortifications are used" (54)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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