Found 1946 Hypotheses across 195 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Pre-colonial centralization predicts more political centralization and more regional development.Amodio, Francesco - Pre-colonial ethnic institutions and party politics in Africa, 2022 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates the degree of political centralization in pre-industrial and the political competitive outcomes in 15 modern-day Sub-Sahara African countries. The authors first report that pre-colonial centralization decreases political competitiveness in modern day countries, advocating that traditional power structures play a role in modern day politics. The authors then use light-density as a proxy for regional development and test developmental outcomes based on political centralization and competitiveness. They report pre-colonial centralization positively affected regional development and suggest this could be due to more centralized institutions increasing the capacity of chiefs to mobilize voters, in turn lowering political competition and increasing the accountability of elected officials. Many controls are introduced.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. The relationship between pre-colonial political centralization and modern political centralization will diminish with constituency boundary changes.Amodio, Francesco - Pre-colonial ethnic institutions and party politics in Africa, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the degree of political centralization in pre-industrial and the political competitive outcomes in 15 modern-day Sub-Sahara African countries. The authors first report that pre-colonial centralization decreases political competitiveness in modern day countries, advocating that traditional power structures play a role in modern day politics. The authors then use light-density as a proxy for regional development and test developmental outcomes based on political centralization and competitiveness. They report pre-colonial centralization positively affected regional development and suggest this could be due to more centralized institutions increasing the capacity of chiefs to mobilize voters, in turn lowering political competition and increasing the accountability of elected officials. Many controls are introduced.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Pre-colonial centralization predicts less political competition in modern day Africa. Amodio, Francesco - Pre-colonial ethnic institutions and party politics in Africa, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the degree of political centralization in pre-industrial and the political competitive outcomes in 15 modern-day Sub-Sahara African countries. The authors first report that pre-colonial centralization decreases political competitiveness in modern day countries, advocating that traditional power structures play a role in modern day politics. The authors then use light-density as a proxy for regional development and test developmental outcomes based on political centralization and competitiveness. They report pre-colonial centralization positively affected regional development and suggest this could be due to more centralized institutions increasing the capacity of chiefs to mobilize voters, in turn lowering political competition and increasing the accountability of elected officials. Many controls are introduced.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Ecological diversity promotes state centralization.Fenske, James - Ecology, trade, and states in pre-colonial Africa, 2014 - 2 Variables

    The author analyzes 440 Sub-Saharan African societies to test whether trade across ecologically diverse zones is predictive of degree of state centralization (state capacity or strength of state) in pre-colonial Africa. The author finds that diverse ecology is predictive of state capacity and that trade supports class stratification. The author also emphasizes the importance of historical contingency and ethnographic data consultation in understanding mechanisms in individual cases.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Taboos on using the name of the deceased will be positively associated with name uniqueness, and negatively associated with belief in reincarnation, ancestor worship, societal size, and societal complexity (114).Alford, Richard - Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practices, 1987 - 23 Variables

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Political centralization predicts increases in public goods and development outcomes.Osafo-Kwaako, Philip - Political centralization in pre-colonial Africa, 2013 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates commonly accepted theories that purport to explain political centralization and investigate their relevance to sub-Saharan Africa. The leading ideas for the formation of political centralization using a worldwide sample include population density, inter-state warfare, and trade. However, the authors reported these factors are not predictive of the sub-Saharan Africa sample. The authors suggest that the lack of agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa may have stunted population density therefore inhibiting political centralization and that Africa’s poor economic performance is, in part, due to lack of political centralization.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Agricultural potential may predict population density, which in turn could predict political centralization in the world sample, but not in the African sample.Osafo-Kwaako, Philip - Political centralization in pre-colonial Africa, 2013 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates commonly accepted theories that purport to explain political centralization and investigate their relevance to sub-Saharan Africa. The leading ideas for the formation of political centralization using a worldwide sample include population density, inter-state warfare, and trade. However, the authors reported these factors are not predictive of the sub-Saharan Africa sample. The authors suggest that the lack of agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa may have stunted population density therefore inhibiting political centralization and that Africa’s poor economic performance is, in part, due to lack of political centralization.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Political centralization will be predicted by population density, frequency of being attacked, and trade in the worldwide sample, but not in the Africa sub-sample.Osafo-Kwaako, Philip - Political centralization in pre-colonial Africa, 2013 - 5 Variables

    This article investigates commonly accepted theories that purport to explain political centralization and investigate their relevance to sub-Saharan Africa. The leading ideas for the formation of political centralization using a worldwide sample include population density, inter-state warfare, and trade. However, the authors reported these factors are not predictive of the sub-Saharan Africa sample. The authors suggest that the lack of agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa may have stunted population density therefore inhibiting political centralization and that Africa’s poor economic performance is, in part, due to lack of political centralization.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. Precolonial centralization will be positively correlated with public goods provisioning in Africa. (195)Gennaioli, Nicola - The modern impact of precolonial centralization in Africa, 2007 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the authors empirically assess the relationship between precolonial centralization and the implementation of modernization programs by African governments. Their findings indicate that current African countries tend to have better provisioning of public goods (including better access to education, healthcare, and infrastructure) when their ethnic groups' precolonial institutions were more centralized.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Jusidictional hierarchy will be correlated with the democraticness of traditional political systems in Africa.Neupert-Wentz, Clara - The democraticness of traditional political systems in Africa, 2021 - 2 Variables

    Using a new expert survey, the authors explore the democraticness of traditional political systems (TPS) in 159 ethnic groups in Africa. Their initial analysis finds that measures of public preference input and political process control are particularly strong contributors to the degree that a society may develop democracy in their TPS. They also find that societies with powerful elders are more likely to be democratic, while more hierarchically organized political systems and those with kings, chiefs, and segmentary lineages are less likely.

    Related HypothesesCite