Found 4540 Hypotheses across 454 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of vegetable consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  2. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of fat consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  3. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with eating maize as a staple food (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  4. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be correlated with the societal importance of women's work in the subsistence economy (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  5. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be related to the presence of absence of food taboos and similarly for food cravings (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  6. The presence or absence of morning sickness will be associated with various societal variables, including type and intensity of agriculture, settlement pattern, and community size (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  7. "[There is easier divorce in] societies without monetary arrangements . . . in societies with extended family households . . . and in societies with matrilocal residence" (308)Minturn, Leigh - Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behavior, 1969 - 4 Variables

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  8. Prestige-bias is more common in pastoralists than in hunter-gatherers.Bira, Temechegn G. - Cultural Learning Among Pastoralist Children, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines patterns of cultural learning in pastoralist societies and compares them to those found in hunter-gatherer societies. The study analyzed 198 texts from 13 pastoralist cultures in the eHRAF World Cultures database and found that most cultural skills and knowledge were acquired in early childhood, with parents and non-parental adults as the primary sources of transmission. Teaching was the most common form of learning across all age groups, with minimal variation in transmission between different age groups. While similarities were found between the cultural learning patterns of pastoralists and hunter-gatherers, pastoralists were less likely to mention learning from peers and more likely to mention learning via local enhancement and stimulus enhancement. The importance of teaching did not increase with age in pastoralist societies, unlike in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  9. Societies in which morning sickness was not observed will be significantly less likely to have meat as a staple and slightly less likely to have rice as a staple than societies in which morning sickness was observed (129).Flaxman, Samuel M. - Morning sickness: a mechanism for protecting mother and embryo, 2000 - 3 Variables

    Pregnancy sickness is characterized by nausea, vomiting, and food aversions during pregnancy, particularly during the first trimester. Previous work has asserted an adaptationist explanation for this phenomenon: pregnancy sickness protects the embryo from the toxic compounds found in many foods via expulsion (i.e., vomiting) of potentially dangerous foods and by encouraging aversions to foods likely to harbor toxins or pathogens. The authors reexamine 27 small-scale societies previously investigated by Minturn and Weiher (1984) for evidence of pregnancy sickness and food aversions in light of the fetal protection hypotheses.

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  10. Concerted transmission is more common in pastoralists than hunter-gatherers.Bira, Temechegn G. - Cultural Learning Among Pastoralist Children, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines patterns of cultural learning in pastoralist societies and compares them to those found in hunter-gatherer societies. The study analyzed 198 texts from 13 pastoralist cultures in the eHRAF World Cultures database and found that most cultural skills and knowledge were acquired in early childhood, with parents and non-parental adults as the primary sources of transmission. Teaching was the most common form of learning across all age groups, with minimal variation in transmission between different age groups. While similarities were found between the cultural learning patterns of pastoralists and hunter-gatherers, pastoralists were less likely to mention learning from peers and more likely to mention learning via local enhancement and stimulus enhancement. The importance of teaching did not increase with age in pastoralist societies, unlike in hunter-gatherer societies.

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