Found 2118 Hypotheses across 212 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Technological complexity is positively associated with population size (1).Collard, Mark - Risk, mobility or population size?: Drivers of technological richness among ..., 2013 - 2 Variables

    This paper builds off previous research into the effect of population size and resource risk on complexity of subsistence technology by investigating the relationship between these independent variables and total number of material items and techniques used by various western North American hunter-gatherer groups. This tally of total technological complexity is found to be insignificantly related to population size or residential mobility; however, there is a significant correlation in the expected direction between technological complexity and one measure of resource risk (mean annual temperature during driest month). Tying this finding to previous analyses of subsistence technologies, the authors theorize that environmental risk is a pervasive driver of technological ingenuity and cultural evolution.

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  2. Technological complexity is positively associated with risk of resource failure (1).Collard, Mark - Risk, mobility or population size?: Drivers of technological richness among ..., 2013 - 6 Variables

    This paper builds off previous research into the effect of population size and resource risk on complexity of subsistence technology by investigating the relationship between these independent variables and total number of material items and techniques used by various western North American hunter-gatherer groups. This tally of total technological complexity is found to be insignificantly related to population size or residential mobility; however, there is a significant correlation in the expected direction between technological complexity and one measure of resource risk (mean annual temperature during driest month). Tying this finding to previous analyses of subsistence technologies, the authors theorize that environmental risk is a pervasive driver of technological ingenuity and cultural evolution.

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  3. Population size will influence toolkit structure (6).Collard, Mark - Causes of toolkit variation among hunter-gatherers: a test of four competing..., 2005 - 2 Variables

    This study tests four hypotheses that propose potential environmental and social predictors of toolkit size and complexity among hunter-gatherers. Hypotheses predicting relationships between population size, residential mobility, type of food resources and toolkit structure are not supported. Risk of resource failure is the only variable that is significantly associated with toolkit structure.

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  4. Toolkit complexity and diversity will be positively associated with population size (253).Collard, Mark - Niche construction and the toolkits of hunter–gatherers and food producers, 2011 - 3 Variables

    The researchers test the relationship between toolkit complexity and diversity as defined by Oswalt (1973) and environmental and demographic variables. Neither population size nor risk of resource failure predict toolkit characteristics among all groups in the sample. However, population size is significantly positively correlated with toolkit diversity and complexity among food-producers, whereas environmental factors indicating risk of resource failure are significantly positively correlated among hunter-gatherers. This leads the researchers to suggest that food-producers' effectiveness at niche construction is a result of their large population size, which thus has a larger effect on toolkit composition than does environmental risk relative to hunter-gatherers.

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  5. Residential mobility will influence toolkit structure (5).Collard, Mark - Causes of toolkit variation among hunter-gatherers: a test of four competing..., 2005 - 2 Variables

    This study tests four hypotheses that propose potential environmental and social predictors of toolkit size and complexity among hunter-gatherers. Hypotheses predicting relationships between population size, residential mobility, type of food resources and toolkit structure are not supported. Risk of resource failure is the only variable that is significantly associated with toolkit structure.

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  6. Population size will be associated with toolkit richness and complexity independent of rain and effective temperature.Collard, Mark - Population size and cultural evolution in nonindustrial food-producing societies, 2013 - 2 Variables

    Seeking to resolve contradictions between previous studies, these authors conduct empirical analysis on the relationship between population size and cultural evolution. Results indicate that population size influences toolkit richness and complexity, even when proxies for risk of resource failure are introduced in the regression model. Authors speculate that the association is weaker for hunter-gatherers because those societies are more affected by risk of resource failure and have institutions that facilitate cultural evolution despite smaller population size. There also may be a threshold effect in the influence of population size on toolkit structure.

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  7. The characteristics of resources exploited for food will influence toolkit structure (2).Collard, Mark - Causes of toolkit variation among hunter-gatherers: a test of four competing..., 2005 - 2 Variables

    This study tests four hypotheses that propose potential environmental and social predictors of toolkit size and complexity among hunter-gatherers. Hypotheses predicting relationships between population size, residential mobility, type of food resources and toolkit structure are not supported. Risk of resource failure is the only variable that is significantly associated with toolkit structure.

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  8. The relationship between population size and toolkit diversity and complexity will be greater among food-producing (i.e. pastoralist, horticulturalist, and agriculturalist) groups than among hunter-gatherers, whereas relationship between risk of resource failure and toolkit diversity and complexity will be greater among hunter-gatherers than among food-producers (253).Collard, Mark - Niche construction and the toolkits of hunter–gatherers and food producers, 2011 - 3 Variables

    The researchers test the relationship between toolkit complexity and diversity as defined by Oswalt (1973) and environmental and demographic variables. Neither population size nor risk of resource failure predict toolkit characteristics among all groups in the sample. However, population size is significantly positively correlated with toolkit diversity and complexity among food-producers, whereas environmental factors indicating risk of resource failure are significantly positively correlated among hunter-gatherers. This leads the researchers to suggest that food-producers' effectiveness at niche construction is a result of their large population size, which thus has a larger effect on toolkit composition than does environmental risk relative to hunter-gatherers.

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  9. Risk of resource failure will influence toolkit structure (4).Collard, Mark - Causes of toolkit variation among hunter-gatherers: a test of four competing..., 2005 - 3 Variables

    This study tests four hypotheses that propose potential environmental and social predictors of toolkit size and complexity among hunter-gatherers. Hypotheses predicting relationships between population size, residential mobility, type of food resources and toolkit structure are not supported. Risk of resource failure is the only variable that is significantly associated with toolkit structure.

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  10. Controlling for resource risk, population size will predict tool kit complexity (p. S390).Collard, Mark - Population size as an explanation for patterns in the paleolithic archaeolog..., 2013 - 3 Variables

    Previous studies have yielded contradictory results on the relationship between population size and cultural evolution. Focusing on tool complexity these authors introduce the risk of resource failure as a possible confounding variable. They conclude that population does not predict tool kit complexity when controlling on other factors. There were significant correlations between tool kit complexity and some of the resource measures.

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