Found 4490 Hypotheses across 449 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. There will be a negative association between alcoholism and ceremonial drinking (32).Klausner, Samuel Z. - Sacred and profane meanings of blood and alcohol, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines a hypothesis that ceremonial drinking is negatively associated with heavy secular drinking. Empirical analysis does not support this association, and the author proposes an alternative theory of alcohol consumption and the problem of evil. Hypotheses relating alcohol consumption to menstrual taboos and the uses of blood in society are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. ". . . that where blood is considered holy, as indicated by the existence of a severe menstrual taboo, blood will tend not to be used secularly; nor will alcohol, its symbolic equivalent, tend to be drunk heavily in purely secular situations" (39)Klausner, Samuel Z. - Sacred and profane meanings of blood and alcohol, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines a hypothesis that ceremonial drinking is negatively associated with heavy secular drinking. Empirical analysis does not support this association, and the author proposes an alternative theory of alcohol consumption and the problem of evil. Hypotheses relating alcohol consumption to menstrual taboos and the uses of blood in society are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. "Factor II, Inebriety, is primarily weighted on: quantity consumed on one occasion, duration of drinking episode, frequency of drunkenness, approval of drunkenness, and boisterousness" (27)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: i. descriptive measurements of drinking..., 1965 - 6 Variables

    Factor analysis is employed to examine variables related to alcohol consumption. Hypotheses related to the integration of drinking, inebriety, aggression while intoxicated, and quantity of drinking are examined.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. "Factor IV, Quantity [of drinking], is primarily weighted on: general consumption, frequency of drinking, procurement effort, extent of problem" (27)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: i. descriptive measurements of drinking..., 1965 - 5 Variables

    Factor analysis is employed to examine variables related to alcohol consumption. Hypotheses related to the integration of drinking, inebriety, aggression while intoxicated, and quantity of drinking are examined.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. The extent of problem score (i.e. problems caused by alcoholism) will be positively associated with alcohol consumption and approval of drunkenness and negatively associated with integration of drinking (57, 60).Whitehead, Paul C. - Explaining alcoholism: an empirical test and reformation, 1974 - 4 Variables

    This article examines a hypothesis that associates alcoholism with the structure and quality of social norms related to drinking. Analysis yields little support for this hypothesis, but the amount of alcohol consumed by members of the society emerges as an important predictive variable. A new theory of alcoholism that takes this variable into account is discussed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. "There is a negative correlation between diffusion of nurturance and extensiveness of menstrual taboos" (100)Stephens, William N. - The oedipus complex: cross-cultural evidence, 1962 - 2 Variables

    The author attempts to test the "Oedipus-complex" hypothesis--the psychoanalytic idea that under certain conditions (such as the long-post partum sex taboo) males are sexually attracted to their mothers and as a consequence certain fears and anxiety are generaated. The hypothesis is tested at the societal-level using ethnographic data.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. "Societies characterized by community endogamy [will] be more likely than other societies to be characterized also by relatively severe menstrual taboos" (283).Carroll, Michael P. - Totem and taboo, purity and danger…and fads and fashion in the study of poll..., 1983 - 2 Variables

    This article examines three theories regarding the existence of pollution rules. Results show support for a psychological theory put forward by Freud that predicts a relationship between father-child contact, post-partum sex taboos, and menstrual taboos.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. ". . . there is no relationship . . . [between] frequency of drunkenness . . . [and] all measures related to integrated drinking" (39)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. "Among the societies with aboriginal drinking frequency of drunkenness was positively correlated with frequency of ceremonial drinking." (459)Barry III, Herbert - Sociocultural aspects of alcohol addiction, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This article examines cultural variation in alcoholism with a particular focus on the role of imperialist contact. Cultural prohibition of alcohol and child-rearing variables are also considered. Several hypotheses are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tended to be higher in hostility change, in sociability intensity, availability of alcoholic beverages, procurement effort and extent of problem" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite