Found 1493 Hypotheses across 150 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Agricultural economy type (Herding-Plus, Egalitarian, Individualistic, or Semi-Marketized) will be associated with the presence of certain demographic and environmental characteristics. (111)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 16 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  2. Dependence on agriculture for subsistence will be associated with exclusive usufruct property rights. (78)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 2 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  3. Dependence on agriculture for subsistence will be positively associated with sedentism. (87)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 2 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  4. Dependence on agriculture for subsistence will be associated with terrestrial resource stress. (81)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 3 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  5. Classic foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes (47)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  6. Transitional foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes (49).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  7. HWO foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes. (48)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  8. IWO foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes. (48)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  9. PO foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes. (48)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  10. PWO foraging economies will be associated with certain environmental attributes. (48)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 10 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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