Found 2323 Hypotheses across 233 Pages (0.014 seconds)
  1. Foraging groups with lower levels of economic development (Classic and transitional foragers) can be identified with certain property and distribution characteristics (42).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 11 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  2. Foraging groups with middling levels of economic development (Human-Wealth-Oriented and Intangible-Wealth-Oriented societies) can be identified by certain property and distribution characteristics.Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 11 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  3. Foraging societies with high levels of economic development (Politically-Oriented and Physical-Wealth-Oriented societies) can be identified by certain property and distribution characteristics (44).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 11 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  4. Institutions of property and distribution among foragers will be associated with economic development in varying ways (41).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 11 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  5. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction with both Simmons' (137) and Murdock's (1967) measures of private property ownership.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property, 1992 - 25 Variables

    The present study aims to assess the reliability of Simmons' (1937) database of 109 variables coded for 71 societies. Simmons' data was evaluated against matching societies and variables from Murdock's (1967) Ethnographic Atlas. The ultimate purpose of Rudmin's analysis is to identify the features of societies that are correlated with the private ownership of property. To do so, Simmons' reliable variables are tested against four measures of property ownership, two from Simmons and two from Murdock. Rudmin discusses results and speculates why certain clusters of societal variables correlate with private property ownership.

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  6. Social differentiation will be positively associated with property crime (250).Leavitt, Gregory C. - General evolution and Durkheim's hypothesis of crime frequency: A cross-cult..., 1992 - 15 Variables

    This paper is an investigation into the relationship between social differentiation as a proxy for societal 'development' and various categories of crime. A positive relationship is interpreted by the author as empirical cross-cultural support for Durkheim's theory that these two factors will increase together as parallel processes of 'sociocultural evolution'.

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  7. Social differentiation will be positively associated with violent crime (249).Leavitt, Gregory C. - General evolution and Durkheim's hypothesis of crime frequency: A cross-cult..., 1992 - 16 Variables

    This paper is an investigation into the relationship between social differentiation as a proxy for societal 'development' and various categories of crime. A positive relationship is interpreted by the author as empirical cross-cultural support for Durkheim's theory that these two factors will increase together as parallel processes of 'sociocultural evolution'.

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  8. Social differentiation will be positively associated with indices of miscellaneous crime (251).Leavitt, Gregory C. - General evolution and Durkheim's hypothesis of crime frequency: A cross-cult..., 1992 - 20 Variables

    This paper is an investigation into the relationship between social differentiation as a proxy for societal 'development' and various categories of crime. A positive relationship is interpreted by the author as empirical cross-cultural support for Durkheim's theory that these two factors will increase together as parallel processes of 'sociocultural evolution'.

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  9. Findings: A factor analysis of traits used to develop a settlement pattern scale of cultural complexity yielded three important factors. Factor 6, "Economic" (oblique rotation), loaded heavily and positively on property, trade, and status variables (245)McNett, Charles W., Jr. - Factor analysis of a cross-cultural sample, 1973 - 6 Variables

    This study employs factor analysis to develop a settlement pattern scale of cultural complexity. Political, economic, and religious factors are identified and implications for the structure of the cultural system are discussed.

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  10. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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