Found 4194 Hypotheses across 420 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Low population density will be associated with high paternal involvementAlcorta, Candace Storey - Paternal behavior and group competition, 1982 - 2 Variables

    The author, Candace Alcorta, theorizes that low population density gives rise to a suite of factors that together are predictive of a society with internally directed population control strategies. In turn, there is an emphasis for a cooperative internal economic system among family, and a higher investment by fathers in their children.

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  2. Controlling for mode of subsistence and male contribution, father-infant proximity (proxy for direct infant care) is negatively correlated with polygyny (p. 52).Marlowe, Frank W. - Paternal investment and the human mating system, 2000 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the interrelated roles of male parental investment (males' infant/child care and resource provisioning) and male-male competition (variation in male status) on the degree of monogamy or polygyny in a society. Marlowe argues that Degree of parental investment affects females' interest in resource-shopping versus gene-shopping. Also discussed is the idea that male-male competition affects males' inclination toward harem-defense or coercive polygyny. Particular attention is paid to variation in parental investment and male stratification across subsistence types.

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  3. Male aggressiveness is negatively correlated with father-infant proximity (55).Marlowe, Frank W. - Paternal investment and the human mating system, 2000 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the interrelated roles of male parental investment (males' infant/child care and resource provisioning) and male-male competition (variation in male status) on the degree of monogamy or polygyny in a society. Marlowe argues that Degree of parental investment affects females' interest in resource-shopping versus gene-shopping. Also discussed is the idea that male-male competition affects males' inclination toward harem-defense or coercive polygyny. Particular attention is paid to variation in parental investment and male stratification across subsistence types.

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  4. Regions will differ with father involvement (422).Hewlett, Barry S. - Fathers' roles in hunter-gatherer and other small-scale cultures, 2010 - 2 Variables

    This study evaluates recent research on the roles of fathers in child development in hunting-gathering, simple farming, and pastoral communities around the world. The authors review previously conducted studies as well as highlight the varying theoretical approaches that many of these previous studies have taken.

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  5. Increased levels of paternal provisioning were associated with harsher views of male, but not female sexual infidelity .Scelza, B. A. - Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous ..., 2019 - 2 Variables

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  6. Increased levels of paternal investment and provisioning were associated with harsher views of male, but not female emotional infidelity .Scelza, B. A. - Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous ..., 2019 - 2 Variables

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  7. Male aggressiveness was the strongest predictor of degree of polygyny, when tested against father-infant proximity, male contribution to subsistence, and male aggressiveness (55).Marlowe, Frank W. - Paternal investment and the human mating system, 2000 - 4 Variables

    This article explores the interrelated roles of male parental investment (males' infant/child care and resource provisioning) and male-male competition (variation in male status) on the degree of monogamy or polygyny in a society. Marlowe argues that Degree of parental investment affects females' interest in resource-shopping versus gene-shopping. Also discussed is the idea that male-male competition affects males' inclination toward harem-defense or coercive polygyny. Particular attention is paid to variation in parental investment and male stratification across subsistence types.

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  8. Maternal grandmothers will tend to increase child survival more than paternal grandmothers (10).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 3 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  9. Paternal proximity during infancy and childhood is positively correlated with paternal warmth (p. 270).Veneziano, Robert A. - The importance of paternal warmth, 2003 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates paternal warmth, particularly its relationship with parental proximity (often used as its proxy) and maternal warmth. The author also investigates whether paternal warmth, paternal proximity, materal warmth, and socialization for aggression are good predictors of theft, homicide, and violence in offspring.

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  10. Parental involvement will be negatively correlated with the importance of witchcraft (p. 170).Quinlan, Robert J. - Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggres..., 2007 - 4 Variables

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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