Found 4620 Hypotheses across 462 Pages (0.035 seconds)
  1. There are ethnographic accounts of human societies that are/were known to regularly practice placentophagy by someone other than the mother.Young, Sharon M. - In Search of Human Placentophagy: A Cross-Cultural Survey of Human Placenta ..., 2010 - 1 Variables

    The present research examines the consumption, treatment, and disposal of the human placenta in a sample of 179 societies. The findings reveal differences between placental mammals and humans as maternal placentophagy, the consumption of the placenta, is rare. Treatment and disposal of the placenta is variable but ubiquitous cross-culturally.

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  2. There are ethnographic accounts of human societies that specify the special handling/treatment/disposition of the placenta following parturition other than placentophagy.Young, Sharon M. - In Search of Human Placentophagy: A Cross-Cultural Survey of Human Placenta ..., 2010 - 1 Variables

    The present research examines the consumption, treatment, and disposal of the human placenta in a sample of 179 societies. The findings reveal differences between placental mammals and humans as maternal placentophagy, the consumption of the placenta, is rare. Treatment and disposal of the placenta is variable but ubiquitous cross-culturally.

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  3. There are ethnographic accounts of human societies specifying particular cultural beliefs about how placenta handling can influence a person's life.Young, Sharon M. - In Search of Human Placentophagy: A Cross-Cultural Survey of Human Placenta ..., 2010 - 1 Variables

    The present research examines the consumption, treatment, and disposal of the human placenta in a sample of 179 societies. The findings reveal differences between placental mammals and humans as maternal placentophagy, the consumption of the placenta, is rare. Treatment and disposal of the placenta is variable but ubiquitous cross-culturally.

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  4. Positive treatment of pets will be present across cultures.Gray, Peter B. - Human–Pet Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2011 - 1 Variables

    Using a sample of 60 societies from eHRAF, this study explores the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in human-pet dynamics. The authors focus on understanding the range of functions of pets and the positive or negative treatment of pets. In addition, they test whether human investment in pets is a significant challenge of evolutionary theory. First, the results support that there are distinct functions of pets, challenging the common view of contemporary function of pets as emotional surrogates. Secondly, the data collected show an ambivalent treatment of pets across cultures, including small-scale societies. Finally, the research does not support the idea that human investment in pets sacrifices their reproductive success.

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  5. The function of pets will be cross-culturally different from the view of pets as playthings and emotional surrogates for children.Gray, Peter B. - Human–Pet Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2011 - 1 Variables

    Using a sample of 60 societies from eHRAF, this study explores the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in human-pet dynamics. The authors focus on understanding the range of functions of pets and the positive or negative treatment of pets. In addition, they test whether human investment in pets is a significant challenge of evolutionary theory. First, the results support that there are distinct functions of pets, challenging the common view of contemporary function of pets as emotional surrogates. Secondly, the data collected show an ambivalent treatment of pets across cultures, including small-scale societies. Finally, the research does not support the idea that human investment in pets sacrifices their reproductive success.

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  6. Human investment in pets will sacrifice their reproductive success on behalf of pets.Gray, Peter B. - Human–Pet Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2011 - 1 Variables

    Using a sample of 60 societies from eHRAF, this study explores the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in human-pet dynamics. The authors focus on understanding the range of functions of pets and the positive or negative treatment of pets. In addition, they test whether human investment in pets is a significant challenge of evolutionary theory. First, the results support that there are distinct functions of pets, challenging the common view of contemporary function of pets as emotional surrogates. Secondly, the data collected show an ambivalent treatment of pets across cultures, including small-scale societies. Finally, the research does not support the idea that human investment in pets sacrifices their reproductive success.

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  7. High socialization pressure and group cohesion in value orientation will be positively and independently associated with cultural complexity (186, 194).Zern, David - The impact of values on development in a cross-cultural sample, 1982 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates relationships between socialization practices, group values, and cultural complexity. Analysis suggests that child-rearing variables and group cohesion in value orientation contribute significantly and independently to cultural complexity.

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  8. In colder climates, infants will more likely be carried in cradles. In warmer climates, infants will more likely be carried in slings (164).Whiting, John W.M. - Environmental constraints on infant care practices, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines infant carrying practices across cultures. The author suggests that infant carrying practices are affected by both climate and history. Findings indicate regional patterns in infant carrying practices and in the borrowing of infant carrying practices within regions. Results support the hypothesis.

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  9. Borrowing in infant carrying practices will be seen within cool and cold climates and within warm and hot climates, but not between these regions (164).Whiting, John W.M. - Environmental constraints on infant care practices, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines infant carrying practices across cultures. The author suggests that infant carrying practices are affected by both climate and history. Findings indicate regional patterns in infant carrying practices and in the borrowing of infant carrying practices within regions. Results support the hypothesis.

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  10. Societies with shared linguistic heritage are positively associated with the guardian spirit complex (371)Swanson, Guy E. - The search for a guardian spirit: a process of empowerment in simpler societies, 1973 - 2 Variables

    The complex set of beliefs and practices in which the cult of the guardian spirit consisted is examined.

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