Found 4300 Hypotheses across 430 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Broad supernatural punishments will be positively associated with the evolution of political complexity.Gray, Russell D. - Cultural macroevolution matters, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Researchers sampled 106 Austronesian societies from the Pulotu database to study the way political complexity evolves in relation to religious beliefs and practices. Specifically, they attempt to test the causal theory that supernatural punishment played a causal role in the emergence of large, complex societies. They use phylogenetic models to control for Galton's Problem in testing the supernatural punishment hypothesis in an effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of utilizing cross-cultural datasets in evaluating evolutionary change in human social organization.

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  2. Social Stratification will be positively associated with the evolution of political complexity.Gray, Russell D. - Cultural macroevolution matters, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Researchers sampled 106 Austronesian societies from the Pulotu database to study the way political complexity evolves in relation to religious beliefs and practices. Specifically, they attempt to test the causal theory that supernatural punishment played a causal role in the emergence of large, complex societies. They use phylogenetic models to control for Galton's Problem in testing the supernatural punishment hypothesis in an effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of utilizing cross-cultural datasets in evaluating evolutionary change in human social organization.

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  3. High political complexity has coevolved with moralizing high gods (2, 5)Watts, Joseph - Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods precede the evolu..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate whether moralizing high gods and, more generally, supernatural punishment precede, sustain, or follow political complexity. The cultural traits at hand are mapped onto phylogenetic trees representing the descent and relatedness of 96 Austronesian cultures.

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  4. The presence of moralizing high gods facilitates and sustains high political complexity (2, 5).Watts, Joseph - Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods precede the evolu..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate whether moralizing high gods and, more generally, supernatural punishment precede, sustain, or follow political complexity. The cultural traits at hand are mapped onto phylogenetic trees representing the descent and relatedness of 96 Austronesian cultures.

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  5. High political complexity has coevolved with broad supernatural punishment (2, 5).Watts, Joseph - Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods precede the evolu..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate whether moralizing high gods and, more generally, supernatural punishment precede, sustain, or follow political complexity. The cultural traits at hand are mapped onto phylogenetic trees representing the descent and relatedness of 96 Austronesian cultures.

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  6. Belief in broad supernatural punishment facilitates and sustains high political complexity (2, 5).Watts, Joseph - Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods precede the evolu..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate whether moralizing high gods and, more generally, supernatural punishment precede, sustain, or follow political complexity. The cultural traits at hand are mapped onto phylogenetic trees representing the descent and relatedness of 96 Austronesian cultures.

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  7. Moralizing high gods are most likely to be found in ecologically inhospitable and unpredictable environments, in politically complex societies, in societies near (or linguistically related to) other societies with high gods, and in societies with animal husbandry and/or agriculture.Botero, Carlos A. - The ecology of religious beliefs, 2014 - 8 Variables

    Belief in moralizing high gods (MHGs) has been theorized as a response to unfavorable environments, as a way to normalize behavior. In this study, researchers test the theory by creating a model for predicting the distribution of MHGs. They run many alternative models, testing the effects of resource abundance, climate stability, and pertinent social factors on the occurrence of belief in MHGs. Based on the ten most supported models, they create an average model that predicts MHGs within cultures with “excellent” accuracy.

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  8. Individual cooperation will be positively correlated with societal belief in invisible supernatural agents (High gods, theories of spirit aggression, and warning).Bourrat, Pierrick - Supernatural punishment and individual social compliance across cultures, 2011 - 2 Variables

    Derived from the fear of supernatural punishment hypothesis, this paper explores whether the prosocial attitude of a group or individuals will increase with the threat of punishment from a high god or visible supernatural agent, such as sorcerers and witches. The author found that fear of supernatural punishment did not affect prosocial behavior and suggested that religious beliefs may give rise to institutions with the task of enforcing social compliance rather than direct control.

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  9. Contrary to the Moral Gods Hypothesis, complex societies precede broad supernatural punishment of moral transgressions (227).Whitehouse, Harvey - Complex societies precede moralizing gods throughout world history, 2019 - 2 Variables

    Researchers tackle the moral gods hypothesis which proposes that moral gods enabled large-scale societies to evolve. They use 414 societies spanning 10,000 years in Seshat: Global History Databank and code 51 measures of social complexity and four measures of moral gods. The findings of the present study challenge the moral gods hypothesis. In the societies studied, complex societies appear to precede moral gods rather than the inverse of moral gods preceding complex societies.

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  10. Belief in moralizing High Gods will be associated with cultural complexity (621).Stark, Rodney - Gods, rituals, and the moral order, 2001 - 8 Variables

    Stark attempts to resituate Tylor's formulation of religion by calling into question Swanson's (1960) and Peregrine's (1996) findings that supernatural sanctions and moral behavior are consistently correlated in small-scale societies. Positing that Swanson's correlations were confounded by variables related to cultural complexity, Stark tests the association of presence of moralizing Gods with cultural complexity explicitly, as well as measures of morality in various nations as provided by the World Values Survey (1990-1991). The robust correlations across cultures noted below, as well as cross-national findings, provide support for the researcher's theory that it is particular conceptions of God rather than participation in rites and rituals which empower religion to sustain complex moral culture.

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