Found 1750 Hypotheses across 175 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Food-producing populations are more likely than hunter-gatherers to have labiodentals.Blasi, D.E. - Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configuration, 2019 - 2 Variables

    Using ethnography, historical linguistics, paleoanthropology, and speech biomechanics, the present study examines the relationship between labiodentals and the post-Neolithic period with the introduction of agriculture and softer diets. The results offer support for the linguist, Charles Hockett's, hypothesis that the shift in bite configuration in the post-Neolithic period, as well as the persistence of overbite and overjet, facilitates and makes the articulation of labiodentals more prevalent. Using cross-cultural comparison, findings also reveal that societies that produce their food are more likely to evolve and keep labiodentals than those that are not food-producing. Contact with other societies is also a mode by which societies gain labiodentals. Lastly, the expansion of agricultural and food processing technology over time has been imperative to labiodental articulations.

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  2. There will either be an absence of labiodentals in languages spoken in Australia, Greenland, and southern Africa or if present are associated with words borrowed through contact with European languages.Blasi, D.E. - Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configuration, 2019 - 2 Variables

    Using ethnography, historical linguistics, paleoanthropology, and speech biomechanics, the present study examines the relationship between labiodentals and the post-Neolithic period with the introduction of agriculture and softer diets. The results offer support for the linguist, Charles Hockett's, hypothesis that the shift in bite configuration in the post-Neolithic period, as well as the persistence of overbite and overjet, facilitates and makes the articulation of labiodentals more prevalent. Using cross-cultural comparison, findings also reveal that societies that produce their food are more likely to evolve and keep labiodentals than those that are not food-producing. Contact with other societies is also a mode by which societies gain labiodentals. Lastly, the expansion of agricultural and food processing technology over time has been imperative to labiodental articulations.

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  3. "Matrilineality, cassava use, and cassava processing are positively related" (p.104).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 3 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  4. Processing technology will be more highly developed (mechanized) under the same conditions in which agricultural technology is more intense (p.106).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 9 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  5. "Cassava will be more important where there are fewer food-getting strategies (less of a mix of subsistence strategies, wage labor, cash crops, government supplies, etc.); in turn food diversity will be positively associated with such cultural ecological variables as markets, access to markets, population density, and more elaborate technology" (p.101).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 7 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  6. "Bantu language and cassava are positively associated" (p.104).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 2 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  7. There will be a higher rate of transition from uxorilocality to virilocality than the inverse transition.Fortunato, Laura - Your place or mine? A phylogenetic comparative analysis of marital residence..., 2010 - 2 Variables

    Aiming to better understand human demographic and dispersal history, the study uses Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods to trace post-marital residence and cultural changes among 27 Indo-European and 135 Austronesian languages. They suggest that changes from uxorilocality to other types of residences (neolocality and virolocality) are more common than the inverse transitions. The results are generally supported with one exception: Austronesian societies have a higher rate of transition from neolocality to uxorilocality (1.5) than the other way around (0.9). Other relevant findings are that proto-Indo-European societies tend to follow virilocality, while proto-Malayo-Polynesian uxorilocality. There is a commonality for both language families to present instability of uxorilocality and unusual loss of uxorilocality.

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  8. There will be a higher rate of transition from uxorilocality to neolocality than the inverse transition.Fortunato, Laura - Your place or mine? A phylogenetic comparative analysis of marital residence..., 2010 - 2 Variables

    Aiming to better understand human demographic and dispersal history, the study uses Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods to trace post-marital residence and cultural changes among 27 Indo-European and 135 Austronesian languages. They suggest that changes from uxorilocality to other types of residences (neolocality and virolocality) are more common than the inverse transitions. The results are generally supported with one exception: Austronesian societies have a higher rate of transition from neolocality to uxorilocality (1.5) than the other way around (0.9). Other relevant findings are that proto-Indo-European societies tend to follow virilocality, while proto-Malayo-Polynesian uxorilocality. There is a commonality for both language families to present instability of uxorilocality and unusual loss of uxorilocality.

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  9. Cassava consumption and production will increase when a society is faced with a higher prevalence of food scarcity / hunger (p.94).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 2 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  10. The number of language speakers will predict the rate of word change in a language.Greenhill, Simon J. - Population Size and the Rate of Language Evolution: A Test Across Indo-Europ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    How is the evolution of language shaped by speaker population size? Through comparative data analyses of 153 language pairs from the Austronesian, Indo-European, and Niger-Congo language families, the authors find that the influence of population size on language evolution is not the same in the three language families. Only in Indo-European languages did a smaller population size of language-speakers significantly predict more word loss.

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