Found 1474 Hypotheses across 148 Pages (0.039 seconds)
  1. Social rewards for warriors mediated the positive association between honor culture and intergroup conflicts.Nawata, Kengo - A glorious warrior in war: Cross-cultural evidence of honor culture, social ..., 2019 - 12 Variables

    Research sampled 143 societies from the Standard Cross Cultural Sample to test the relationship between honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflicts. Using mediation analysis based on multiple regression, and structural equation modeling, the research supported the theory that honor culture was positively associated with intergroup conflict, and that this relationship was mediated by social rewards for warriors.

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  2. Honor culture is positively associated with social rewards for warriors.Nawata, Kengo - A glorious warrior in war: Cross-cultural evidence of honor culture, social ..., 2019 - 8 Variables

    Research sampled 143 societies from the Standard Cross Cultural Sample to test the relationship between honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflicts. Using mediation analysis based on multiple regression, and structural equation modeling, the research supported the theory that honor culture was positively associated with intergroup conflict, and that this relationship was mediated by social rewards for warriors.

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  3. Honor culture is positively associated with intergroup conflicts.Nawata, Kengo - A glorious warrior in war: Cross-cultural evidence of honor culture, social ..., 2019 - 8 Variables

    Research sampled 143 societies from the Standard Cross Cultural Sample to test the relationship between honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflicts. Using mediation analysis based on multiple regression, and structural equation modeling, the research supported the theory that honor culture was positively associated with intergroup conflict, and that this relationship was mediated by social rewards for warriors.

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  4. War wealth will be positively associated with the frequency of external warfareEff, E. Anthon - Farming and Fighting: An Empirical Analysis of the Ecological-Evolutionary T..., 2012 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to reevaluate Nolan's (2003) study on the primary determinants of war. They reanalyze his hypotheses with what they claim are more robust measures and methodology. They conclude that there is only a little evidence supporting Nolan's theories, that more productive technology and higher population density predict war, and that overall ecological-evolutionary and sociopolitical explanations of war are equally supported by empirical data.

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  5. The number of benefits from war will be positively associated with mortality in warfare (449, 453).Glowacki, Luke - The role of rewards in motivating participation in simple warfare, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article examines reasons for participation in warfare and tests a hypothesis concerning cultural rewards from war. Data supports this hypothesis. The authors also critique alternative theories of participation in warfare that draw on group selection and the risk of punishment.

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  6. ". . . the more frequently the political communities of a cultural unit are attacked, the more frequently they will attack other societies" (285)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  7. An ethnic group's share of common borders with polygynous neighboring groups will be positively correlated with their risk of intergroup conflict. (409)Koos, Carlo - Polygynous Neighbors, Excess Men, and Intergroup Conflict in Rural Africa, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors argue that polygyny creates social inequality in which economically advantaged men marry multiple women and economically disadvantaged men marry late in life or potentially never. The institution of polygyny results in a higher proportion of single men without families ("excess men"), who, the authors propose, may turn to violence to achieve higher wealth or prestige. Following this theory, the authors hypothesize that societies with more polygynous neighbors will be at higher risk for intergroup conflict, for which they find robust support. They also find that young men in polygynous societies, who are more likely to be economically disadvantaged and have less prestige, are also more likely to feel as though they are treated unequally and more ready to resort to violence, supporting the authors' theorized underlying mechanism.

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  8. Risk of intergroup conflict between polygynous groups and their neighbors will be positively correlated with border proximity. (410)Koos, Carlo - Polygynous Neighbors, Excess Men, and Intergroup Conflict in Rural Africa, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors argue that polygyny creates social inequality in which economically advantaged men marry multiple women and economically disadvantaged men marry late in life or potentially never. The institution of polygyny results in a higher proportion of single men without families ("excess men"), who, the authors propose, may turn to violence to achieve higher wealth or prestige. Following this theory, the authors hypothesize that societies with more polygynous neighbors will be at higher risk for intergroup conflict, for which they find robust support. They also find that young men in polygynous societies, who are more likely to be economically disadvantaged and have less prestige, are also more likely to feel as though they are treated unequally and more ready to resort to violence, supporting the authors' theorized underlying mechanism.

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  9. The increasing frequency of differentiation in societies will be positively associated with an increase in external war, civil war, and riots (feuding will decrease in frequency as societies become increasingly differentiated) (54)Leavitt, Gregory C. - The frequency of warfare: an evolutionary perspective, 1977 - 5 Variables

    Thi study tests a hypothesis on the relationship between frequency of warfare and sociocultural development.

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  10. Boreal forests will be negatively associated with the frequency of external warfareEff, E. Anthon - Farming and Fighting: An Empirical Analysis of the Ecological-Evolutionary T..., 2012 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to reevaluate Nolan's (2003) study on the primary determinants of war. They reanalyze his hypotheses with what they claim are more robust measures and methodology. They conclude that there is only a little evidence supporting Nolan's theories, that more productive technology and higher population density predict war, and that overall ecological-evolutionary and sociopolitical explanations of war are equally supported by empirical data.

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