Found 3054 Hypotheses across 306 Pages (0.045 seconds)
  1. "As far as the mother-in-law is concerned, matrilineal societies are most formal and bilateral least" (193)Goody, Jack - Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a comment, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  2. ". . . residential propinquity influences a society's kin avoidance. . . . [There is an] association between mother-in-law/son-in-law avoidance and [their] degree of community coresidence" (243, 247)Witkowski, Stanley - A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesis, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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  3. "The residential proximity hypothesis suggests that institutionalized avoidance practices should be more likely to occur when the avoiding parties are living in the same household than when they are just living in the same community." [Mother-in-law/son-in-law avoidance increases with the degree of household co-residence] (249)Witkowski, Stanley - A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesis, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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  4. Mother-in-law/son-in-law avoidance will be positively associated with economic interaction between mother-in-law and son-in-law (74, 77).Pans, A.E.M.J. - The mother-in-law taboo, 1998 - 2 Variables

    This article examines mother-in-law avoidance, theorizing it is "a device for distinguishing the son-in-law/mother-in-law relationship from the husband-wife relationship in societies where these relationships tend to be similar as far as their economic aspect is concerned” (71). The conditions that may give rise to economic interaction between son-in-law and mother-in-law, such as matrilocal residence, are also discussed.

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  5. "With regard to the relationship between a woman and her husband's father, the matrilineal systems show the greatest degree of informality (and least avoidance), while patrilineal are the least informal" (193)Goody, Jack - Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a comment, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  6. "Tylor advanced the plausible hypothesis that mother-in-law avoidance should be highly correlated with matrilocal residence" (366)Murdock, George Peter - Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study re-examines patterns of cross-sex kin relationships using new ethnographic data. The author looks specifically at cross-sex kin relationship in relation to marriage rules.

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  7. In patrilocal cultures, where the young bride dominated by a mother-in-law becomes, in middle age, a mother-in-law herself, will be positively associated with a shift in status (6)Bart, Pauline B. - Why women's status changes in the middle ages: the turns of the social ferri..., 1969 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on the cross-cultural data comparing the relationship between changes in status and availability of important roles, with an emphasis on women. Cultural and structural aspects of society are examined to discover their relationship to the position of women after their child-bearing years.

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  8. ". . . greater privacy would be associated with great [avoidance of] coresident mother-in-law . . ." (278)Cozby, Paul C. - Privacy, love and in-law avoidance, 1971 - 2 Variables

    Authors explore the relationship between privacy among newlywed couples and romantic love as a basis for marriage. Authors also consider the relationship between newlywed privacy and kin avoidence. Both associations are found to be statistically significant.

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  9. "Residence proved to be unrelated to avoidance [of parents-in-law] by either husband or wife" (313)Sweetser, Dorrian Apple - Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest taboo, 1966 - 2 Variables

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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  10. "A relation appears between . . . avoidance customs . . . and . . . residence after marriage" (2)Tylor, Edward B. - On a method of investigating the development of institutions: applied to la..., 1961 - 2 Variables

    This paper, the first cross-cultural study published in 1889 (reprinted here) asserts that tabulation and classification are important methodological tools to study anthropological subjects. The author investigates the development of institutions of marriage and descent, tabulating data on residence, descent, kinship terminology, wife capture, and exogamy.

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