Found 1391 Hypotheses across 140 Pages (0.03 seconds)
  1. Female premarital sex is more likely to be restricted in societies where female contribution to subsistence is low.Šaffa, Gabriel - Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  2. A high degree of dependence on domesticated animals will decrease female agricultural contributions.Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  3. Social complexity will be positively associated with greater occupational choice for women (207)Naroll, Maud - Women's occupational opportunities: a cross-cultural test, 1989 - 2 Variables

    A brief review of research on women's status is presented. Predictions are tested about women's choice of occupation in relation to levels of social complexity.

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  4. Female contribution to diet in horticultural groups will be negatively associated with dependence on cultigens (214).Martin, M. Kay - Female of the species, 1975 - 3 Variables

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  5. Controlling for subsistence technology, there will be no significant association between romantic love and subsistence dependence (57).Mukhopadhyay, Carol Chapnick - The function of romantic love: a re-appraisal of the coppinger and rosenblat..., 1979 - 3 Variables

    This article reexamines Coppinger and Rosenblatt’s (1968) finding that romantic love insures marital stability where there is low subsistence dependence between the spouses. Analysis suggests that Coppinger and Rosenblatt’s associated variables, romantic love and subsistence dependence, are only related through their common association with subsistence technology.

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  6. Advanced agriculture will be positively associated with corvee labor, slavery, and/or craft division of labor (253).Sheils, Howard Dean - A comparative study of human sacrifice, 1980 - 4 Variables

    This study takes an economic approach in examining the practice of human sacrifice as it relates to notions of the economic value of human life. Codes are included.

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  7. Matrilineal descent will be positively associated with female contribution to subsistence and negatively associated with dependence on cultivation (219).Martin, M. Kay - Female of the species, 1975 - 4 Variables

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  8. Preindustrial societies will have division of labor by gender (551).Murdock, George Peter - Comparative data on the division of labor by sex, 1937 - 1 Variables

    Data on the distribution of economic activities between the sexes is presented. Tabulations suggest that preindustrial societies have a strong tendency to segregate labor by gender, and that no occupation is exclusively assigned to women.

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  9. Extra-household division of labor will be postively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  10. Female economic importance will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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