Found 1752 Hypotheses across 176 Pages (0.039 seconds)
  1. Hunter-gatherers tend to have non-fixed settlements (51, 44).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  2. Hunter-gatherers tend to have national jurisdiction without any levels of hierarchy (51, 96).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  3. Hunter-gatherers tend to have lower social complexity (51,91).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  4. Hunter-gatherers tend not to have social stratification (51, 102).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  5. Hunter-gatherers tend not to be exclusively patrilineal (51, 186).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  6. Number of residential moves per year will be negatively associated with percent contribution to diet through fishing and positively associated with percent contribution to diet through hunting and gathering (61).Marlowe, Frank W. - Hunter-gatherers and human evolution, 2005 - 4 Variables

    This article explores the relationships between habitat and social organization among humans and other species. Diet, technology, group size, home range, mobility, kinship, marital residence, sexual division of labor, mating system, central places, food sharing, and egalitarianism are all considered.

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  7. Hunter-gatherers tend to rely on non-monetary economic exchange (51, 132).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  8. Hunter-gatherers tend not to believe in a high god (51, 426).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  9. Hunter-gatherers, if they have class stratification, tend to base it on wealth (51, 106).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  10. "[Size of community is related to subsistence economy]. Local communities tend to be very small in gathering, hunting, pastoral, and fishing societies. . . . Horticulturalists and extensive cereal cultivators occupy . . . larger settlements . . . and intensive agriculturalists [have largest communities]"Murdock, George Peter - Correlations of exploitative and settlement patterns, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This study examines relationships between subsistence type, population size, and sedentarism. Hunting, gathering, fishing, and herding societies tend to be smaller than horticultural and agricultural societies. Horticulture, agriculture, and fishing societies tend to be more sedentary.

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