Found 3184 Hypotheses across 319 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Agriculturalist populations will have lower infant and child mortality rates than hunter-gatherer populations.Volk, Anthony A. - Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptation, 2013 - 3 Variables

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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  2. Infant and child mortality rates will be higher among contemporary hunter-gatherer populations than in western, industrialized populations.Volk, Anthony A. - Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptation, 2013 - 2 Variables

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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  3. For females, marriage type and subsistence type are associated (43)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  4. For males, marriage type is associated with subsistence type (43)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  5. Subsistence type is associated with ease of divorce (44)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  6. Female punishment is associated with subsistence type (45)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  7. Agricultural societies will have higher paternal certainty than hunter-gatherer societies (230).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  8. Human bodies are designed to function well for about seven decades in the environment in which our species evolved (2)Gurven, Michael - Longevity Among Hunter-Gatherers: A Cross-Cultural Examination, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article seeks to reevaluate the widespread assumption that hunter-gatherers lack the longevity that people in the modern, industrialized world enjoy. Through modeling life expectancy, mortality, and other demographic trends among extant hunter-gatherer, gatherer-horticulturalists, and horticulturalists societies they are able to challenge this belief. The authors conclude that longevity is a "novel feature of Homo sapiens" and that seven decades seems to be the natural lifespan of a human.

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  9. For both sexes, subsistence type is not associated with age at first marriage (44)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  10. Competition for resources is positively correlated with type of land tenure system.Moritz, Mark - Comparative Study of Territoriality across Forager Societies, 2020 - 4 Variables

    Researchers investigated the variation of land tenure systems across forager societies using the economic defensibility model. The study attempted to explain the variation in tenure systems across 30 hunter-gatherer societies. Using data on defense and sharing of resources among groups, and indicators of resource density, resource predictability, and competition for resources, the researchers were unable to explain the variation. This study highlights the vast range of diversity and complexity of foragers subsistence strategies, and proposes that it may be more telling to conceptualize tenure systems among hunter-gatherer societies as assemblages of multiple property regimes. While there was no overall evidence that environmental variables of resource density and predictability explain variation in tenure systems, researchers did find that increasing population density, and greater competition for resources leads to greater territoriality.

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