Found 2144 Hypotheses across 215 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Adult violence mortality is higher among horticulturalists compared to hunter-gatherers (164).Hames, Raymond - Pacifying Hunter-Gatherers, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this article Hames addresses the long-standing disagreements between evolutionary theories regarding human warfare (more specifically between Rousseauian and Hobbesian frameworks). This study posits that while most current and previous research focuses on the discrepancies between the frequency and intensity with which warfare takes place between hunter-gatherer and large-scale societies, the ability for societies to live in peace with their neighbors despite the possibility for warfare, is the most important evolutionary trait. Coexisting peacefully is what distinguishes human socially and politically from chimpanzees whereas warfare itself is a more primitive trait humans share with previous ancestors. Hames concludes that going forward, use of phylogenetic methods to control for common ancestry, and use of archaeological data would lead to new and more comprehensive findings. Although largely a review of principal warfare literature, Hames does present an original statistical finding on adult violence mortality which is reported below.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Agriculturalist populations will have lower infant and child mortality rates than hunter-gatherer populations.Volk, Anthony A. - Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptation, 2013 - 3 Variables

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Subsistence mode will be correlated with the presence of inequality.Wilson, Kurt M. - The Marginal Utility of Inequality: A Global Examination Across Ethnographic..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the authors draw from intensity theory and combine previous research from the fields of behavioral ecology, economics, and social evolution to analyze drivers in the emergence and persistence of inequality across the world. They propose that environmental heterogeneity and circumscription (the difficulty of moving and establishing oneself in a new environment relative to remaining in the current one) play a significant role in the stratification of societies. Their results indicate that situations arise from various environmental conditions and levels of circumscription that may result in an individual giving up autonomy for material gain, thus favoring inequality.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Primarily hunter-gatherers are more likely to use clubs and throwing sticks for violence than hunter-gatherers.Hrnčíř, Václav - The Use of Wooden Clubs and Throwing Sticks among Recent Foragers, 2023 - 2 Variables

    The idea that archaic humans used wooden clubs as weapons is popular but not based on much archaeological evidence, due to the poor preservation of organic materials in the archaeological record. A new study analyzed 57 recent hunting-gathering societies and found that the majority used clubs for violence and/or hunting. The use of throwing sticks was less frequent. The study suggests that the use of clubs by early humans was highly probable, but that prehistoric weapons may have been quite sophisticated and carried strong symbolic meaning. The great variation in the forms and use of clubs and throwing sticks among recent hunter-gatherers suggests that similar variation may have existed in the past.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Hunter-gatherers are more likely to use clubs for hunting and fishing than primarily hunter-gatherer groups.Hrnčíř, Václav - The Use of Wooden Clubs and Throwing Sticks among Recent Foragers, 2023 - 2 Variables

    The idea that archaic humans used wooden clubs as weapons is popular but not based on much archaeological evidence, due to the poor preservation of organic materials in the archaeological record. A new study analyzed 57 recent hunting-gathering societies and found that the majority used clubs for violence and/or hunting. The use of throwing sticks was less frequent. The study suggests that the use of clubs by early humans was highly probable, but that prehistoric weapons may have been quite sophisticated and carried strong symbolic meaning. The great variation in the forms and use of clubs and throwing sticks among recent hunter-gatherers suggests that similar variation may have existed in the past.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Hunter-gatherers will experience more famine than those with other modes of subsistence (1).Berbesque, J. Colette - Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists, 2014 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. For females, marriage type and subsistence type are associated (43)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. For males, marriage type is associated with subsistence type (43)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. Agricultural societies will have higher paternal certainty than hunter-gatherer societies (230).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Subsistence type is associated with ease of divorce (44)Apostolou, Menelaos - Sexual selection under parental choice in agropastoral societies, 2010 - 2 Variables

    Previous studies have proposed a model of sexual selection that dictates that along with female and male choice, parental choice constitutes a significant sexual selection force in our species. This article aims at examining whether this model can also account for the mating patterns typical of agricultural and pastoral societies. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

    Related HypothesesCite