Found 2091 Hypotheses across 210 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Strength of child training for achievement, self reliance, and independence will be negatively correlated with accumulation of food resources (52-53).Barry III, Herbert - Relation of child training to subsistence economy, 1959 - 4 Variables

    This article discusses the relationship between child training and certain variables, such as economy.

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  2. "Societies with a definite sex difference were preponderantly higher than those without evidence of a sex difference in frequency of ceremonial drinking and tended to be higher in frequency of religious drinking and in approval of drinking" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  3. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tend to be higher inavailability of alcoholic beverages" (58)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  4. "Societies with a definite sex difference [in drinking alcohol tend to be societies where] alcohol was used aboriginally rather than being use postcontact" (56)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. "Among societies with aboriginal drinking those with a definite sex difference have significantly higher scores in occurrence of extreme hostility" (58)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 3 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tended to be higher in hostility change, in sociability intensity, availability of alcoholic beverages, procurement effort and extent of problem" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Food accumulation will be more highly correlated with compliance than over variables such as size of settlement, degree of political integration, social stratification, greater part of women in predominant subsistence activity, polygyny, bride price and bride service, unilineal descent (59).Barry III, Herbert - Relation of child training to subsistence economy, 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article discusses the relationship between child training and certain variables, such as economy.

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  8. "Pressures toward achievement and self reliance are . . . [negatively related] with ceremonial drinking" (41)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 8 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  9. "There is a positive correlation between male narcissism on the one hand, and pressure for the child to achieve, anxiety over failure to achieve and frequency of achievement behavior on the other" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  10. Strength of child training for responsibility and obedience will be positively correlated with accumulation of food resources (52-53).Barry III, Herbert - Relation of child training to subsistence economy, 1959 - 3 Variables

    This article discusses the relationship between child training and certain variables, such as economy.

    Related HypothesesCite