Found 3287 Hypotheses across 329 Pages (0.047 seconds)
  1. "[T]he relative importance of boys' [puberty] rites tended to go more often with low drunkenness while girls' rites usually went with high drunkenness" (60)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  2. "As shown, presence of adolescent segregation tended to go with a low frequency of drunkenness" (58)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  3. "Sleeping arrangements were not significantly related to drunkenness. But mother-child households . . . tended to go with a low frequency of drunkenness" (55)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  4. ". . . bride price tended to go with low drunkenness, and bride service was more often associated with high drunkenness" (61)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  5. ". . . an important mother, a good deal of indulgence, and a stress upon achievement or self-reliance tended to go with cultural practices that were related to a high frequency of drunkenness" (72)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 6 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  6. "As predicted, simple local communities and simple states (i.e. a low level of political complexity) tended to be associated with a high frequency of drunkenness while complex communities and complex states were related to a lower frequency of drunkenness" (36)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  7. "As predicted, bilateral groups were strongly associated with a high frequency of drunkenness. Non-bilateral groups, of course, tended to be low drinkers" (35)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  8. "Matrilineal kin groups were inconsistent. But, cognatic groups tended toward high drunkenness while patrilineal groups were definitely associated with low drunkenness" (35)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  9. "The presence of this custom [couvade] was frequently associated with high drunkenness" (64)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  10. "Bilocal, neolocal and, possibly, matrilocal residence patterns should be associated with a high level of drunkenness while patrilocal societies should be associated with a low level of drunkenness" (23)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

    Related HypothesesCite