Found 1166 Hypotheses across 117 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Increased frequency of drunkenness is associated with societal customs surrounding dependence, thereby (i) negatively associated with indulgence of dependence in infancy, (ii) positively associated with demands for achievement in childhood, and (iii) negatively associated with dependent-seeking behavior in adulthood (p. 866).Bacon, Margaret K. - The dependency-conflict hypothesis and the frequency of drunkenness, 1974 - 5 Variables

    This study is a reexamination of Bacon's (1965) previous cross-cultural study regarding drinking. The current study supports the dependency-conflict hypothesis that frequency of drunkenness is related to dependency needs in childhood and adulthood.

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  2. "Achievement is stressed in the same kin groups [bilateral and cognatic] that tend to gratify strongly needs for dependency, passivity, and indulgence" (49)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  3. ". . . an important mother, a good deal of indulgence, and a stress upon achievement or self-reliance tended to go with cultural practices that were related to a high frequency of drunkenness" (72)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 6 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  4. "In short, those kin groups that are generally high in drunkenness are also prone to gratify strongly the needs of their young children" (47)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  5. "Indulgence of dependence is negatively related to frequency of [drunkenness]" (35)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 5 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  6. "The overall measures of indulgence in infancy and childhood show significant negative correlations with general consumption of alcohol" (35)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  7. "None of the [indulgence of dependence measures are related to] ceremonial drinking" (35)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  8. "Matrilineal kin groups were inconsistent. But, cognatic groups tended toward high drunkenness while patrilineal groups were definitely associated with low drunkenness" (35)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  9. An analysis of interrelated social structure variables revealed that bilateral kinship is relatively the most important predictor of drunkenness (37, 38)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  10. "In short, these results indicate that relatively speaking, bilateral and cognatic kin groups rely more heavily upon an economy that presumably forces the father to leave his home for long periods of time . . . thus encouraging them [children] to adopt feminine modes of behavior" (39)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

    Related HypothesesCite