Found 1488 Hypotheses across 149 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. In West Africa, proximity to an international slave port predicts a greater probability that a society will be organized around preservation of slave wealth in nuclear polygynous families under inherited local political aristocracies.Whatley, Warren - How the international slave trade underdeveloped Africa, 2022 - 6 Variables

    The goal of the paper is to demonstrate how international slave trade spread the institution of slavery throughout Africa, resulting in long-term effects of the continent’s income and political centralization. The author first estimated the travel time to slave ports from each society in the Ethnographic Atlas to determine predicting factors for the adoption of slave trade in African societies. The author reported that societies with high exposure to slave capture in the past were more likely to have the custom of slavery and the custom of polygyny. The author further suggested that slavery institutions emerged in West Africa through local, politically centralized aristocratic systems while emerging in East Africa through the preservation of wealth within the nuclear family over generations.

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  2. Proximity to an international slave port may increase the spread of slavery and polygyny jointly.Whatley, Warren - How the international slave trade underdeveloped Africa, 2022 - 3 Variables

    The goal of the paper is to demonstrate how international slave trade spread the institution of slavery throughout Africa, resulting in long-term effects of the continent’s income and political centralization. The author first estimated the travel time to slave ports from each society in the Ethnographic Atlas to determine predicting factors for the adoption of slave trade in African societies. The author reported that societies with high exposure to slave capture in the past were more likely to have the custom of slavery and the custom of polygyny. The author further suggested that slavery institutions emerged in West Africa through local, politically centralized aristocratic systems while emerging in East Africa through the preservation of wealth within the nuclear family over generations.

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  3. The international slave trade will be positively correlated with the spread of slavery in Africa.Whatley, Warren - How the international slave trade underdeveloped Africa, 2022 - 2 Variables

    The goal of the paper is to demonstrate how international slave trade spread the institution of slavery throughout Africa, resulting in long-term effects of the continent’s income and political centralization. The author first estimated the travel time to slave ports from each society in the Ethnographic Atlas to determine predicting factors for the adoption of slave trade in African societies. The author reported that societies with high exposure to slave capture in the past were more likely to have the custom of slavery and the custom of polygyny. The author further suggested that slavery institutions emerged in West Africa through local, politically centralized aristocratic systems while emerging in East Africa through the preservation of wealth within the nuclear family over generations.

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  4. Risk of intergroup conflict between polygynous groups and their neighbors will be positively correlated with border proximity. (410)Koos, Carlo - Polygynous Neighbors, Excess Men, and Intergroup Conflict in Rural Africa, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors argue that polygyny creates social inequality in which economically advantaged men marry multiple women and economically disadvantaged men marry late in life or potentially never. The institution of polygyny results in a higher proportion of single men without families ("excess men"), who, the authors propose, may turn to violence to achieve higher wealth or prestige. Following this theory, the authors hypothesize that societies with more polygynous neighbors will be at higher risk for intergroup conflict, for which they find robust support. They also find that young men in polygynous societies, who are more likely to be economically disadvantaged and have less prestige, are also more likely to feel as though they are treated unequally and more ready to resort to violence, supporting the authors' theorized underlying mechanism.

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  5. Degree of polygyny will be negatively associated with women's inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  6. Children's vaccination rate for measles will be negatively correlated with maternal ancestral ethnic group exposure to the slave trade and matrilineal inheritance.Athias, Laure - Demand for Vaccination in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Vertical Legacy of the Sla..., 2022 - 3 Variables

    The authors of this study integrate recent data with data on ancestral ethnic groups' exposure to the slave trade in order to examine the relationship between this historical exposure and children vaccination status against measles. They find evidence to support their hypothesis that children from mothers whose ancestors belonged to an ethnic group that exported slaves are less likely to be vaccinated against measles, theorizing that this correlation stems from distrust in medical and governmental institutions. Supporting this theory, they also find that groups historically exposed to the slave trade that have higher preference for traditional practices are even less likely to vaccinate their children against measles.

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  7. Societies where slaves are primarily used as social capital are more likely to be polygynous (246).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  8. Degree of polygyny will be positively related to male bias in inheritance (1).Hartung, John - Polygyny and inheritance of wealth, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the hypothesis that humans tend to transmit wealth to male heirs where polygyny is possible. The results support this hypothesis.

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  9. Geographic location will be correlated with the presence of inequality.Wilson, Kurt M. - The Marginal Utility of Inequality: A Global Examination Across Ethnographic..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the authors draw from intensity theory and combine previous research from the fields of behavioral ecology, economics, and social evolution to analyze drivers in the emergence and persistence of inequality across the world. They propose that environmental heterogeneity and circumscription (the difficulty of moving and establishing oneself in a new environment relative to remaining in the current one) play a significant role in the stratification of societies. Their results indicate that situations arise from various environmental conditions and levels of circumscription that may result in an individual giving up autonomy for material gain, thus favoring inequality.

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  10. Children's vaccination rate against measles will be negatively correlated with maternal ancestral ethnic group exposure to the slave trade.Athias, Laure - Demand for Vaccination in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Vertical Legacy of the Sla..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    The authors of this study integrate recent data with data on ancestral ethnic groups' exposure to the slave trade in order to examine the relationship between this historical exposure and children vaccination status against measles. They find evidence to support their hypothesis that children from mothers whose ancestors belonged to an ethnic group that exported slaves are less likely to be vaccinated against measles, theorizing that this correlation stems from distrust in medical and governmental institutions. Supporting this theory, they also find that groups historically exposed to the slave trade that have higher preference for traditional practices are even less likely to vaccinate their children against measles.

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