Found 2422 Hypotheses across 243 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Societies with more religious laws in the past are less democratic.Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding - The power of religion, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the extent to which religion has been used to legitimize political power in the past, and the extent to which that carries into contemporary institutions. The authors seek to demonstrate that there is a strong link between the stratification of societies in the past and the presence of autocracies in many of those same areas today. They make their case by putting forward, and testing, three linked theories -- first, that stratified societies are more likely to develop religions based on moralizing high gods as a means of divine legitimization, second, that the societies that used religion for legitimacy in their past are more likely to have religion embedded in their institutions today, and third, that societies that used religion for legitimacy in the past are more likely to be autocracies today.

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  2. Societies that had moralizing high gods in the past are more likely to have religious laws in their state apparatus today.Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding - The power of religion, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the extent to which religion has been used to legitimize political power in the past, and the extent to which that carries into contemporary institutions. The authors seek to demonstrate that there is a strong link between the stratification of societies in the past and the presence of autocracies in many of those same areas today. They make their case by putting forward, and testing, three linked theories -- first, that stratified societies are more likely to develop religions based on moralizing high gods as a means of divine legitimization, second, that the societies that used religion for legitimacy in their past are more likely to have religion embedded in their institutions today, and third, that societies that used religion for legitimacy in the past are more likely to be autocracies today.

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  3. Higher irrigation potential is linked to the presence of moralizing high gods.Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding - The power of religion, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the extent to which religion has been used to legitimize political power in the past, and the extent to which that carries into contemporary institutions. The authors seek to demonstrate that there is a strong link between the stratification of societies in the past and the presence of autocracies in many of those same areas today. They make their case by putting forward, and testing, three linked theories -- first, that stratified societies are more likely to develop religions based on moralizing high gods as a means of divine legitimization, second, that the societies that used religion for legitimacy in their past are more likely to have religion embedded in their institutions today, and third, that societies that used religion for legitimacy in the past are more likely to be autocracies today.

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  4. Priests and witches/sorcerers are more common in stratified societies than in unstratified societies.Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding - The power of religion, 2022 - 6 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the extent to which religion has been used to legitimize political power in the past, and the extent to which that carries into contemporary institutions. The authors seek to demonstrate that there is a strong link between the stratification of societies in the past and the presence of autocracies in many of those same areas today. They make their case by putting forward, and testing, three linked theories -- first, that stratified societies are more likely to develop religions based on moralizing high gods as a means of divine legitimization, second, that the societies that used religion for legitimacy in their past are more likely to have religion embedded in their institutions today, and third, that societies that used religion for legitimacy in the past are more likely to be autocracies today.

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  5. Moralizing high gods are more prevalent in stratified societies than unstratified societies.Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding - The power of religion, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the extent to which religion has been used to legitimize political power in the past, and the extent to which that carries into contemporary institutions. The authors seek to demonstrate that there is a strong link between the stratification of societies in the past and the presence of autocracies in many of those same areas today. They make their case by putting forward, and testing, three linked theories -- first, that stratified societies are more likely to develop religions based on moralizing high gods as a means of divine legitimization, second, that the societies that used religion for legitimacy in their past are more likely to have religion embedded in their institutions today, and third, that societies that used religion for legitimacy in the past are more likely to be autocracies today.

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  6. Hunting will be will be the least likely subsistence strategy; gathering will be the predominant strategy (42).Lee, Richard B. - What hunters do for a living, or, how to make out on scarce resources, 1968 - 3 Variables

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze thesubsistence activities of the Kung Bushmen. These activities are then used as a benchmark for comparing other hunting and gathering societies. A cross-cultural analysis asks: To what extent are the Bushmen typeical of hunter-gatherers in general? Finding suggets that, as a less reliable subsistence source, hunting is only used as the primarily subsistence strategy when there is no alternative viable subsistence strategy. Findings also suggest that hunting is the dominant mode of subsistence only in the highest latitudes.

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  7. Men’s huts/ceremonial houses/clubhouses are negatively related to women’s power in kinship networks. (77)Spain, Daphne - Gendered Space, 1992 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the author examines how gender-segregated space may affect the status of women in nonindustrial societies. Specifically, the author examines predictors of women's status in kinship, inheritance, and labor. The author argues that the gendered partitioning of space contributes to the subordination of women cross-culturally because these practices limit women's access to information which men use to gain status.

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  8. Hunting will be the dominant mode of subsistence only in the highest latitudes (42).Lee, Richard B. - What hunters do for a living, or, how to make out on scarce resources, 1968 - 2 Variables

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze thesubsistence activities of the Kung Bushmen. These activities are then used as a benchmark for comparing other hunting and gathering societies. A cross-cultural analysis asks: To what extent are the Bushmen typeical of hunter-gatherers in general? Finding suggets that, as a less reliable subsistence source, hunting is only used as the primarily subsistence strategy when there is no alternative viable subsistence strategy. Findings also suggest that hunting is the dominant mode of subsistence only in the highest latitudes.

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  9. Socio-cultural values of countries predict COVID-19 mortality rates.Endress, Ansgar D. - Socio-cultural values are risk factors for COVID-19-related mortality, 2022 - 20 Variables

    This paper proposes that the socio-cultural values of countries may be associated with increased mortality due to COVID-19. Using results from the World Values survey, the author assessed which values had the strongest association with a change in COVID-19 mortality in datasets consisting of all countries, upper-middle and high income economies, upper-middle income economies, high income economies, and advanced economies. The author also sought to determine whether the WVS values that were associated with COVID-19 mortality were also associated with general life expectancy. The results showed that COVID-19 mortality was increased in countries that placed a higher value on freedom of speech, political participation, religion, technocracy, post-materialism, social tolerance, law and order, and acceptance of authority. On the other hand, mortality was decreased in countries with high trust in major companies and institutions and that endorsed maintenance of order as a goal for a country. The author also found that values related to COVID-19 mortality did not predict general health outcomes, and that some values that predicted increased COVID-19 mortality actually predicted decreased mortality from other outcomes.

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  10. "The residential proximity hypothesis suggests that institutionalized avoidance practices should be more likely to occur when the avoiding parties are living in the same household than when they are just living in the same community." [Mother-in-law/son-in-law avoidance increases with the degree of household co-residence] (249)Witkowski, Stanley - A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesis, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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