Found 2152 Hypotheses across 216 Pages (0.04 seconds)
  1. More intensive ancestral kinship ties predict more left-wing attitudes on economic dimensions.Fasching, Neil - Ancestral Kinship and the Origins of Ideology, 2023 - 4 Variables

    The preindustrial family structure instilled family members with values that passed through generations and impact today's political attitudes and policies. Three studies show that ancestral kinship structure predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and, among those less engaged in politics, left-wing economic attitudes (though controlling for the country of residence removes this prediction). Stronger country-level ancestral kinship strength also increases anti-LGBT policies and welfare spending. This work indicates that political beliefs are rooted in the value systems and familial institutions created by our forebears.

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  2. More political engagement predicts more right-wing economic attitudes than would be predicted by kinship strength alone, and vice versa.Fasching, Neil - Ancestral Kinship and the Origins of Ideology, 2023 - 5 Variables

    The preindustrial family structure instilled family members with values that passed through generations and impact today's political attitudes and policies. Three studies show that ancestral kinship structure predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and, among those less engaged in politics, left-wing economic attitudes (though controlling for the country of residence removes this prediction). Stronger country-level ancestral kinship strength also increases anti-LGBT policies and welfare spending. This work indicates that political beliefs are rooted in the value systems and familial institutions created by our forebears.

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  3. Stronger country-level kinship tightness is associated with more right-wing cultural policies and more left-wing economic policies.Fasching, Neil - Ancestral Kinship and the Origins of Ideology, 2023 - 3 Variables

    The preindustrial family structure instilled family members with values that passed through generations and impact today's political attitudes and policies. Three studies show that ancestral kinship structure predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and, among those less engaged in politics, left-wing economic attitudes (though controlling for the country of residence removes this prediction). Stronger country-level ancestral kinship strength also increases anti-LGBT policies and welfare spending. This work indicates that political beliefs are rooted in the value systems and familial institutions created by our forebears.

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  4. ". . . small extended and polygynous families which are most likely to form fraternal interest groups are . . . more likely in patrilineal societies" (312)Paige, Jeffery M. - Kinship and polity in stateless societies, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article suggests a theory of the relationship between rules of descent and polity structure. The author suggests that “polity structure in stateless societies is a consequence of the presence or absence of cohesive factions based on lineage or family” (301). Two types of kinship ties produce different polity structures: cross-cutting ties, common in matrilineal societies, lead to political consensus; overlapping ties, common in patrilineal societies, lead to factionalism. Empirical tests support this theory.

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  5. Marriage payments, patrilineal descent, patrilocal residence, extended family forms and importance of inheritance rules will be positively associated with sexual dominance (679)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  6. Controlling on economic and political factors, the effect of marital residence and descent on sexual dominance will approach zero (679)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  7. Controlling on marital residence and descent, the effect of economic and political factors to sexual dominance will approach zero (680)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  8. "There is wide variation in tightness-looseness that is distinct from other dimensions of culture, such as individualism-collectivism" (7990).Harrington, Jesse R. - Tightness-looseness across the 50 united states, 2014 - 2 Variables

    Authors contend that many of the differences across the 50 states can be attributed to the degree to which social entities are "tight" (have many strongly enforced rules and little tolerance to deviance) or "loose" (have few strongly enforced rules and greater tolerance for deviance). Significant correlations were found between many state characteristics and tightness-looseness.

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  9. Female pollution ritual tends will be associated with societal complexity, low female contribution to subsistence, low female status, unilineal kinship and extended families (170).Zelman, Elizabeth Crouch - Women's rights and women's rites: a cross-cultural study of womanpower, 1974 - 6 Variables

    This paper examines ritual surrounding the female reproductive cycle and its relationship with female power. Data support two patterns: female pollution ritual tends to take place in relatively complex societies with low female contribution to subsistence, low female status, unilineal kinship and extended families; male productive ritual, on the other hand, tends to take place in societies with higher female contribution to subsistence, higher female status, cognatic kinship and small families.

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  10. Transgendered male androphilia will be associated with bilateral and double descent (382).VanderLaan, Doug P. - Male androphilia in the ancestral environment: an ethnological analysis, 2013 - 2 Variables

    "The kin selection hypothesis posits that male androphilia evolved because androphilic males invest more in kin, thereby enhancing inclusive fitness." However, increased kin-directed altruism has only been seen in societies that exhibit transgendered male androphilia. To test the validity of the kin selection hypothesis for male androphilia, the authors examine the relationship between ancestral sociocultural conditions, access to kin, and societal reactions to homosexuality and the expression of male androphilia as transgendered or non-transgendered. They find that ancestral sociocultural conditions and bilateral and double descent systems were more common in transgendered than non-transgendered societies.

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