Found 1741 Hypotheses across 175 Pages (0.055 seconds)
  1. More intensive ancestral kinship ties predict more left-wing attitudes on economic dimensions.Fasching, Neil - Ancestral Kinship and the Origins of Ideology, 2023 - 4 Variables

    The preindustrial family structure instilled family members with values that passed through generations and impact today's political attitudes and policies. Three studies show that ancestral kinship structure predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and, among those less engaged in politics, left-wing economic attitudes (though controlling for the country of residence removes this prediction). Stronger country-level ancestral kinship strength also increases anti-LGBT policies and welfare spending. This work indicates that political beliefs are rooted in the value systems and familial institutions created by our forebears.

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  2. More intensive ancestral kinship ties predict more right-wing attitudes on cultural dimensions.Fasching, Neil - Ancestral Kinship and the Origins of Ideology, 2023 - 3 Variables

    The preindustrial family structure instilled family members with values that passed through generations and impact today's political attitudes and policies. Three studies show that ancestral kinship structure predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and, among those less engaged in politics, left-wing economic attitudes (though controlling for the country of residence removes this prediction). Stronger country-level ancestral kinship strength also increases anti-LGBT policies and welfare spending. This work indicates that political beliefs are rooted in the value systems and familial institutions created by our forebears.

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  3. Stronger country-level kinship tightness is associated with more right-wing cultural policies and more left-wing economic policies.Fasching, Neil - Ancestral Kinship and the Origins of Ideology, 2023 - 3 Variables

    The preindustrial family structure instilled family members with values that passed through generations and impact today's political attitudes and policies. Three studies show that ancestral kinship structure predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and, among those less engaged in politics, left-wing economic attitudes (though controlling for the country of residence removes this prediction). Stronger country-level ancestral kinship strength also increases anti-LGBT policies and welfare spending. This work indicates that political beliefs are rooted in the value systems and familial institutions created by our forebears.

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  4. Results will not change when controlling for income disparity (GINI) and cultural individualismHarrington, Jesse R. - Culture and National well-being: should societies emphasize freedom or const..., 2015 - 10 Variables

    The purpose of the present study is to provide insight on the debate concerning how best to organize societies: with more freedom (looseness) or with more constraint (tightness). In a comparison of 32 nations, Harrington, Boski, and Gelfand examine the relationship between tightness/looseness and three dimensions of societal well-being: psychosocial, health, and political/economic outcomes. Findings indicate that excessive constraint and/or freedom contribute to poorer psychosocial, health, and economic/political outcomes, as well as overall national-level well-being. These results suggest that a balance of freedom and constraint is associated with optimal societal well-being.

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  5. The relationship between tightness/looseness and happiness will exhibit a curvilinear relationship, such that very tight and very loose nations have worse outcomes relative to nations intermediate on tightness-loosenessHarrington, Jesse R. - Culture and National well-being: should societies emphasize freedom or const..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The purpose of the present study is to provide insight on the debate concerning how best to organize societies: with more freedom (looseness) or with more constraint (tightness). In a comparison of 32 nations, Harrington, Boski, and Gelfand examine the relationship between tightness/looseness and three dimensions of societal well-being: psychosocial, health, and political/economic outcomes. Findings indicate that excessive constraint and/or freedom contribute to poorer psychosocial, health, and economic/political outcomes, as well as overall national-level well-being. These results suggest that a balance of freedom and constraint is associated with optimal societal well-being.

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  6. The relationship between tightness/looseness and the composite score of all 8 (dependent) variables, such that very tight and very loose nations have worse outcomes relative to nations intermediate on tightness-loosenessHarrington, Jesse R. - Culture and National well-being: should societies emphasize freedom or const..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The purpose of the present study is to provide insight on the debate concerning how best to organize societies: with more freedom (looseness) or with more constraint (tightness). In a comparison of 32 nations, Harrington, Boski, and Gelfand examine the relationship between tightness/looseness and three dimensions of societal well-being: psychosocial, health, and political/economic outcomes. Findings indicate that excessive constraint and/or freedom contribute to poorer psychosocial, health, and economic/political outcomes, as well as overall national-level well-being. These results suggest that a balance of freedom and constraint is associated with optimal societal well-being.

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  7. Higher income will be associated with more favorable views towards competition (383).Hayward, R. David - How competition is viewed across cultures: a test of four theories, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This study draws upon theory from Marx, Weber, postmaterialism, individualism and system justification to explore cultural attitudes and beliefs surroudning competition. Authors test relationships between the attitudes towards competition and economic and religious variables.

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  8. "In those cultures in which residence is patrilocal, virilocal, or avunculocal male genital mutilation will be more frequent than in cultures in which residence is matrilocal or uxorilocal" (922).Eichler, Margrit - Power and sexual fear in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This article examines correlates of sexual fear among men and women. The author concludes that the more authority men have over women, the more women will dread male genitals and vice versa.

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  9. "In those cultures in which residence is patrilocal the incidence of male genital mutilation will be more frequent than in those cultures in which residence is matrilocal" (922).Eichler, Margrit - Power and sexual fear in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This article examines correlates of sexual fear among men and women. The author concludes that the more authority men have over women, the more women will dread male genitals and vice versa.

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  10. "A positive relationships exists between satisfaction potential for the five dimensions of child-training practices and tight-lose societies, and a negative relationship between socialization anxiety potential and tight-loose societies" (280).Hutter, Mark - The relationship of child rearing practices to societal "tightness" and "loo..., 1972 - 3 Variables

    This paper studies Pelto's (1962, 1968) operational definition for the tightness and looseness of societies in relation to child rearing practices. Results suggest that societies with a "tight" social structure will have child training practices that promote conformity and obedience and vice versa.

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