Found 2443 Hypotheses across 245 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. In past Bantu-speaking cultures, matriliny and cattle will have a relationshipHolden, Clare Janki - Spread of cattle led to the loss of matrilineal descent in Africa: a coevolu..., 2003 - 3 Variables

    Through phylogenetic comparison, Holden and Mace explore the relationship between descent and cattle among a sample of 68 Bantu/Bantoid-speaking populations in Africa. The authors posit that when matrilineal cultures adopt cattle, they become patrilineal. Possible theories are offered to explain trends and variation in the data.

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  2. The adoption of cattle will be associated with the loss of matrilinyHolden, Clare Janki - Spread of cattle led to the loss of matrilineal descent in Africa: a coevolu..., 2003 - 4 Variables

    Through phylogenetic comparison, Holden and Mace explore the relationship between descent and cattle among a sample of 68 Bantu/Bantoid-speaking populations in Africa. The authors posit that when matrilineal cultures adopt cattle, they become patrilineal. Possible theories are offered to explain trends and variation in the data.

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  3. High lactose digestive capacity among adults evolved in populations that kept livestock (615).Holden, Clare - Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults, 1997 - 2 Variables

    The ability of adults to digest lactose is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin, a distribution thought to be a result of genetic adaptation to drinking milk from domestic livestock. Two additional hypotheses have been proposed to explain the distribution of high lactose digestion capacity: (1) supplemental calcium in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin D deficiency and (2) maintenance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly arid environments. However, these hypotheses are confounded by the shared ancestry of populations whose lactose digestion capability has been tested. Therefore, the authors test all three hypotheses using a phylogenetic comparative method for 62 cultures.

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  4. There is positive selection for high lactose digestion capacity among adults in populations living in high-latitude, low-sunshine environments (615).Holden, Clare - Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults, 1997 - 2 Variables

    The ability of adults to digest lactose is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin, a distribution thought to be a result of genetic adaptation to drinking milk from domestic livestock. Two additional hypotheses have been proposed to explain the distribution of high lactose digestion capacity: (1) supplemental calcium in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin D deficiency and (2) maintenance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly arid environments. However, these hypotheses are confounded by the shared ancestry of populations whose lactose digestion capability has been tested. Therefore, the authors test all three hypotheses using a phylogenetic comparative method for 62 cultures.

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  5. There is positive selection for high lactose digestion capacity among adults in populations living in drier environments (615).Holden, Clare - Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults, 1997 - 2 Variables

    The ability of adults to digest lactose is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin, a distribution thought to be a result of genetic adaptation to drinking milk from domestic livestock. Two additional hypotheses have been proposed to explain the distribution of high lactose digestion capacity: (1) supplemental calcium in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin D deficiency and (2) maintenance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly arid environments. However, these hypotheses are confounded by the shared ancestry of populations whose lactose digestion capability has been tested. Therefore, the authors test all three hypotheses using a phylogenetic comparative method for 62 cultures.

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  6. Pastoralism is always adopted prior to the development of high lactose digestion capacity among adults (615).Holden, Clare - Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults, 1997 - 2 Variables

    The ability of adults to digest lactose is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin, a distribution thought to be a result of genetic adaptation to drinking milk from domestic livestock. Two additional hypotheses have been proposed to explain the distribution of high lactose digestion capacity: (1) supplemental calcium in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin D deficiency and (2) maintenance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly arid environments. However, these hypotheses are confounded by the shared ancestry of populations whose lactose digestion capability has been tested. Therefore, the authors test all three hypotheses using a phylogenetic comparative method for 62 cultures.

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  7. The effect of losing a mother has the strongest effect on child survival rate in very early life (5).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 2 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  8. The death of the mother will be strongly associated with higher child mortality (5).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 2 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  9. The effect of father death on child survival will be much smaller than the effect of mother death (5).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 3 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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  10. The presence of grandmothers will predict lower child mortality rates (10).Sear, Rebecca - Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival, 2008 - 2 Variables

    Evolutionary anthropologists have long emphasized the puzzle of short inter-birth intervals, extended childhoods, and long post-reproductive lives of humans, in particular the problem it poses for raising children. While there is agreement that mothers receive assistance from kin to offset the high costs of raising children, opinion is equivocal as to which kin help and to what extent they help. Here the authors review 45 studies from historical and contemporary natural fertility populations to assess the effects of various types of kin on child survival rates.

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