Found 1910 Hypotheses across 191 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Mothers who raise their children in multiple family dwellings rather than in private dwellings will tend to be more controlled emotionally, as evidenced by low levels of warmth, hostility, praise, and punishment.Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 6 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  2. ". . . mothers who have extensive duties besides those of child training will require children to be more responsible than mothers who can devote themselves more exclusively to their children" (173-174)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  3. ". . . we hypothesized that mothers are more unstable [in mood] when they must spend large amounts of time caring for children" (171-172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  4. "The Hero should triumph less often in folk tales of societies in which the child training practices include severe punishment for aggression" (359)Wright, G. O. - Projection and displacement: a cross-cultural study of folktale aggression, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This study examines aggression in folktales in relation to child socialization variables. The author suggests that punishment for aggression and aggression anxiety are related to how aggression is portrayed in folktales. Hypotheses are supported.

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  5. "Societies with sex differences [in drinking] tend to have a nomadic or rural settlement pattern, economy based on hunting, less accumulation of food resources, stronger child training toward achievement and more punishment of child for failure to achieve" (59)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  6. "In general, our hypothesis that mothers spend less time caring for their offspring when they have other people to help is confirmed . . ." (171)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  7. "High self reliance, independence training . . . and control of behavior of children through punishment (highlighted in the rigidity score) [are characteristic of societies which believe in] aggressive deities" (164, 166)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 4 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  8. For societies with low permissiveness, a high degree of participation by children in adult activities is correlated with measures of social organization and economy (359)Barry III, Herbert - Cultural influences on childhood participation in adult activities, 1996 - 3 Variables

    This article uses ethnographic reports on a world wide sample of societies for rating frequency of participation by children in adult activities and degree of permissive treatment of children.

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  9. For societies with intermediate permissiveness, a high degree of participation by children in adult activities is correlated with measures of social organization and economy (359)Barry III, Herbert - Cultural influences on childhood participation in adult activities, 1996 - 3 Variables

    This article uses ethnographic reports on a world wide sample of societies for rating frequency of participation by children in adult activities and degree of permissive treatment of children.

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  10. "Punishment for aggression increases the intensity of aggression in situations which are distinctly dissimilar from those in which the punishment occurs" (357)Wright, G. O. - Projection and displacement: a cross-cultural study of folktale aggression, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This study examines aggression in folktales in relation to child socialization variables. The author suggests that punishment for aggression and aggression anxiety are related to how aggression is portrayed in folktales. Hypotheses are supported.

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