Found 2434 Hypotheses across 244 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. "The more wealth a civilization has, the more creativity it is likely to manifest" (184)Naroll, Raoul - Creativity: a cross-historical pilot survey, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the causes of creative florescences in certain time periods in certain societies. Wealth, geographical expansion, democratic support, and external challenge were not significant predictors of creative florescence, but political fragmentation shows a correlation with society’s creativity level.

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  2. "The more fragmented a civilization is, the more creativity is liable to occur within it" (184)Naroll, Raoul - Creativity: a cross-historical pilot survey, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the causes of creative florescences in certain time periods in certain societies. Wealth, geographical expansion, democratic support, and external challenge were not significant predictors of creative florescence, but political fragmentation shows a correlation with society’s creativity level.

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  3. "As a civilization is expanding its geographical boundaries its creativity increases" (184)Naroll, Raoul - Creativity: a cross-historical pilot survey, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the causes of creative florescences in certain time periods in certain societies. Wealth, geographical expansion, democratic support, and external challenge were not significant predictors of creative florescence, but political fragmentation shows a correlation with society’s creativity level.

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  4. "Each civilization has an optimum degree of challenge under the stimulation of which it is most creative; as challenge ranges upward and downward from this optimum, creativity decreases" (187)Naroll, Raoul - Creativity: a cross-historical pilot survey, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the causes of creative florescences in certain time periods in certain societies. Wealth, geographical expansion, democratic support, and external challenge were not significant predictors of creative florescence, but political fragmentation shows a correlation with society’s creativity level.

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  5. "Our findings suggest that centralized states or those led by experienced rulers tend to do well in the game of power politics [i.e., gain territory], while hereditary monarchies tend to do less well, as do states divided by civil war" (340)Naroll, Raoul - Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical survey, 1974 - 7 Variables

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

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  6. "None of the administrative . . . [factors] we examined proved to have any clear relationship with war frequency" (336)Naroll, Raoul - Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical survey, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

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  7. Geographical factors do not promote territorial gain, considering strategy (the winning of entire wars) rather than tactics (the winning of a particular battle) (338)Naroll, Raoul - Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical survey, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

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  8. "It was predicted, in accordance with the deterrence hypothesis, that wars would be less frequent during the periods when the 'Conspicuous State' while in a defensive stance, enjoyed the specific military advantages, than during other periods"(329)Naroll, Raoul - Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical survey, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

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  9. "The geographical factors we studied have had little if any relationship to war frequency among the Conspicuous States we studied . . . . War tended to be slightly less frequent when the Conspicuous States shared a common land boundary with their Conspicuous Rivals" (332)Naroll, Raoul - Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical survey, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

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  10. "Diplomatic policies of the sort here studied have had little if any effect on war frequency among the conflicts we studied. Announcements of intention--warnings by aggressor states--were, if anything, associated with longer or more frequent wars" (333)Naroll, Raoul - Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical survey, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite