Found 3923 Hypotheses across 393 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "The association between menarcheal age and the Gunders mother separation scores . . . [indicates] that this type of stress also leads to early menarche" (228)Whiting, John W.M. - Menarcheal age and infant stress in humans, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between infant stress and early menarche. Empirical analysis suggests that stress in infancy, such as mother-infant separation and head-shaping, are associated with early menarche.

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  2. "[When] we . . . correlated menarcheal age with the Landauer-Whiting measure of infant stress . . . pain and shaping did show a positive association" (226)Whiting, John W.M. - Menarcheal age and infant stress in humans, 1965 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between infant stress and early menarche. Empirical analysis suggests that stress in infancy, such as mother-infant separation and head-shaping, are associated with early menarche.

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  3. Competitive games will be negatively associated with physical contact and comfort in infant socialization (37).Schlegel, Alice - Adolescents at play: a cross-cultural study of adolescent games, 1989 - 4 Variables

    This chapter investigates correlates of competitive adolescent games, focusing on societal and family characteristics as well as socialization variables and personality traits. Data suggest that games meant to encourage competitiveness will be more common for boys than for girls. Competitive games are also statistically associated with low societal and technological complexity, small and monogamous family organization, less physical contact and comfort in infant socialization, less integration in adult activities, and various personality traits.

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  4. "The average menstrual age is younger in societies where the average height of females is greater" (223)Whiting, John W.M. - Menarcheal age and infant stress in humans, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between infant stress and early menarche. Empirical analysis suggests that stress in infancy, such as mother-infant separation and head-shaping, are associated with early menarche.

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  5. Borrowing in infant carrying practices will be seen within cool and cold climates and within warm and hot climates, but not between these regions (164).Whiting, John W.M. - Environmental constraints on infant care practices, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines infant carrying practices across cultures. The author suggests that infant carrying practices are affected by both climate and history. Findings indicate regional patterns in infant carrying practices and in the borrowing of infant carrying practices within regions. Results support the hypothesis.

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  6. ". . . the father is less likely to have a close association with his child in the evil eye cultures" (253)Roberts, John M. - Belief in the evil eye in world perspective, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines the variables that are associated with the evil eye belief cross-culturally. Results suggest that the evil eye belief is significantly associated with various socioeconomic and demographic variables. All hypotheses are supported.

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  7. In colder climates, infants will more likely be carried in cradles. In warmer climates, infants will more likely be carried in slings (164).Whiting, John W.M. - Environmental constraints on infant care practices, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines infant carrying practices across cultures. The author suggests that infant carrying practices are affected by both climate and history. Findings indicate regional patterns in infant carrying practices and in the borrowing of infant carrying practices within regions. Results support the hypothesis.

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  8. ". . . the control of sexual impulses during childhood and adolescence [are] . . . a major problem [in polygynous mother-child households with exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements]" (182)Whiting, John W.M. - The learning of values, 1974 - 2 Variables

    Building on comparative study of the Mormons, Texans, and Zuni in the Rimrock area of Southwestern U.S., the authors cross-cultural test some hypotheses cross-culturally.

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  9. "Societies with beliefs in aggressive supernaturals . . . had fewer nurturant agents, protected the infant less from environmental discomforts, showed him less affection, were more inconsistent in caring for his needs, and took less care of his needs" (168)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 5 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  10. In infancy the mother is most likely to be the principal caretaker (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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