Found 2524 Hypotheses across 253 Pages (0.03 seconds)
  1. ". . . hunting-collecting and herding communities should tend to be migratory, with band organization; whereas fishing and agricultural communities should tend to be sedentary, with village organization" (292)Goodenough, Ward H. - Basic economy and community, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines relationships among mode of production, sedentarism, and population size. Generally, agricultural societies were found to be sedentary and have larger populations, while migratory societies (such as herders or hunters) had smaller population size.

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  2. ". . . there should be a progression upward in mean community size from hunting-collecting, through fishing and herding, to agricultural communities . . ."Goodenough, Ward H. - Basic economy and community, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines relationships among mode of production, sedentarism, and population size. Generally, agricultural societies were found to be sedentary and have larger populations, while migratory societies (such as herders or hunters) had smaller population size.

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  3. "Societies with gathering, hunting, and pastoral economies tend to be nomadic or seminomadic [while societies with fishing, horticulture and agriculture economies tend to be semisedentary or sedentary]" (144)Murdock, George Peter - Correlations of exploitative and settlement patterns, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This study examines relationships between subsistence type, population size, and sedentarism. Hunting, gathering, fishing, and herding societies tend to be smaller than horticultural and agricultural societies. Horticulture, agriculture, and fishing societies tend to be more sedentary.

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  4. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  5. "Ground plans . . . [are] correlated with . . . mean size of local community and intensity of agricultural practices. . . . Circular ground plans would tend to be associated with small communities practicing no . . . or casual agriculture, rectangular with large communities, intensive agriculture" (13)Robbins, Michael C. - House types and settlement patterns, 1966 - 3 Variables

    This article proposes that ground plans may be used as a criterion for determining the relative permanence of settlement patterns in archaelogical societies. Results suggest that impermanent settlements and small community size are significantly associated with circular ground plans and that permanent settlements with larger community sizes are significantly associated with rectangular ground plans.

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  6. Slavery will vary by type of subsistenceHrnčíř, Václav - Archaeology of slavery from cross-cultural perspective, 2017 - 12 Variables

    The authors examine correlations between slavery and variables that can potentially be detected archaeologically. The authors do not test specific hypotheses, but aim to explore the variables in a broader sense. As such, the authors use a grounded theory approach to data analysis in order to examine trends that emerge from the data itself.

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  7. Subsistence based primarily on hunting-gathering will be associated with extensive kinship systems, whereas agropastoralism will be associated with intensive ones (384).Walker, Robert S. - Marrying kin in small‐scale societies, 2014 - 4 Variables

    The authors examine degree of intensiveness (kin-relatedness) among foraging and agropastoralist societies, predicting that hunter-gatherers will pursue more extensive kinship networks in order to maximize residential options in the case of unpredictability or uneven geographic distribution of food resources. Support is found for the hypothesis, and it is suggested that while extensive fission-fusion dynamics are beneficial in foraging systems, the increase in cooperation in large-scale agricultural settlements is aided by norms which encourage kin marriage and relatedness.

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  8. "There is a rough relationship between type of family system and the subsistence pattern ordered according to productivity and stability: independent family most common in hunting and gathering . . . extended family prevaling where fishing, agriculture dominant . . ." (216-217)Nimkoff, M. F. - Types of family and types of economy, 1960 - 2 Variables

    This article posits that nuclear, independent families are more common under certain economic conditions that affect food supply, demand for family labor, physical mobility, and property system. Empirical analysis suggests that nuclear, independent families are associated with hunting and gathering subsistence type and low social stratification.

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  9. Hunter-gatherers tend to live in communities without a city or town and with less than 200 people (51, 81).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 3 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  10. ". . . sedentary communities should have larger populations than migratory communities . . ." (291-292)Goodenough, Ward H. - Basic economy and community, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines relationships among mode of production, sedentarism, and population size. Generally, agricultural societies were found to be sedentary and have larger populations, while migratory societies (such as herders or hunters) had smaller population size.

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