Found 1468 Hypotheses across 147 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 8, "North American tribal culture", loaded highly and positively on latitude 30 degrees or greater; located in North America; natural environment temperate grassland; principal ethnographers American; settlements non-fixed-movement nomadic; daily protein intake 80 grams or higher. Factor 8 loaded negatively on tropics 23 1/2 degrees from equator; games of strategy rather than chance; subsistence by agriculture and food production; African-linguistic affiliation Niger-Congo; Old World; tropical grasslands (61)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 13 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  2. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 2, "father-centered family", loaded highly and positively on patrilocal marital residence and bride price; patrilineal kin group; castes present; Circum-Mediterranean, with Afro-Asiatic linguistic affiliation; active high god; and subsistence by animal husbandry. Factor 2 loaded highly and negatively on painful female initiation rites (57)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 9 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  3. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 4, "paternal authority", loaded highly and positively on household authority with father; high early aggression satisfaction potential; and patrilocal marital residence. Factor 4 loaded highly and negatively on desert grasses; matrilocal marital residence; Athabaskan linguistic affiliation; high anal socialization anxiety; modesty training six years or higher; and matrilineal kin group (58)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 10 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  4. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 12, "adolescent peer group activity", loaded highly and positively on time and setting of adolescent peer groups; conflict regarding achievement and obedient behavor of child; exhibitionistic dancing emphasized; and kin group patrilineal or double descent. Factor 12 loaded negatively on games of skill and wives obtained by bride price (64)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 9 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  5. Findings: Factor T, "Level of Technology", with its stress on pottery and grain for food is suggestive of neolithic technology. The two heaviest positive loadings (oblimax rotation) were noted above. Other heavy positive loadings are: mining and smelting, prevalence of war, basketry, money, weaving, herding, agriculture, domesticated animals other than herded. Highest negative loadings are: warm climate, legendary heroes, fishing, and patrilocal residence (25)Gouldner, Alvin W. - Notes on technology and the moral order, 1962 - 14 Variables

    Using empirical data and statistical methodology, Gouldner and Peterson aim to identify fundamental dimensions across societies, examine the relationships among these dimensions, and evaluate their importance. Data analysis is largely based on factor analysis, and the authors discuss how statistical methods fit into functional social theory.

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  6. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 11, "postpartum sex taboo", loaded highly and positively on postpartum sex taboo lasts more than one year; grandparents and granchild are friendly equals; male initiation ceremonies at puberty; fear of human beings; observation of food taboos. Factor 11 loaded negatively on cousin marriage preferred or prescribed (63)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 7 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  7. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 1, "structural complexity", loaded highly and positively on legal variables, medical variables, social structural complexity, and division of specialized labor. Factor 1 loaded negatively on support to legal clients during judgement (56)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 9 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  8. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 5, "matrilineal kin groups", loaded highly and positively on Crow-type cousin terminology; kin group matrilineal; community segmented on a clan basis; matrilocal marital residence; cousin marriage unilateral; codified laws present. Factor 5 loaded highly and negatively on kin groups patrilineal or double descent; marital residence patrilocal (59)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 9 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  9. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 6, "status as determined by occupation", loaded highly and positively on class stratification based on occupational status; large state is level of political integration; city present; hierarchy of national jurisdiction has 3 or 4 levels; plow present; located in Southeast Asia. Factor 6 loaded negatively on medical client highly hampered from returning to normal social roles; marriage commonly or occasionally polygynous (59-60)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 9 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  10. Increased frequency of natural hazards will be associated with increased subsistence diversity.Ember, Carol R. - Resource stress and subsistence diversification across societies, 2020 - 3 Variables

    Using a cross-cultural sample of 91 societies, this paper draws on ecological theory to test if unpredictable environments will favor subsistence diversification. The general hypothesis is that societies with high climate unpredictability and resource stress would exhibit more subsistence diversity than societies in more stable climates. The authors examined four environmental and resource stress variables while controlling for temperature variance, subsistence activity, and phylogeny. Support was found for 2 of the 4 variables--chronic scarcity and environmental instability. In the discussion they suggest that more commonly observed events (e.g. annual hunger and climate unpredictability) may give people more motivation to change subsistence than rarer events (e.g. natural hazards and famine).

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