Found 2783 Hypotheses across 279 Pages (0.06 seconds)
  1. Language family and population size both predict phoneme inventory size.Hay, Jennifer - Phoneme inventory size and population size, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This study found that the more language speakers there are, the more phonemes in the language. In addition, the more language speakers, the more vowels and consonants. While some language families have more phonemes than others, this did not affect the results. The goal of this paper was only to illustrate a link between the two and the authors hope this work encourages further examination into this relationship.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Relative reliance on consonants vs. vowels in human languages cross-culturally will be associated with different environments (5).Maddieson, Ian - Human language diversity and the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, 2015 - 10 Variables

    In the field of bioacoustics, the Acoustic Adaptation theory suggests that variation in vocalization across different species can be accounted for by the acoustic properties of different habitats. Here, the researchers test consonant- and vowel-heaviness in human languages against various environmental variables in order to examine the theory's potential application to our own species. The authors identify a significant negative correlation between consonant heaviness and temperature, precipitation, and tree cover, and some positive correlation with rugosity and elevation as their most important findings, while acknowledging the potentially influential roles of migration and demographic factors in producing this relationship.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. The "exclusivity gain" model (an N-G-K-I trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. The "alternative" model (an N-I-G-K trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. The "full" model (where all four land tenure norms are transitioned to and from freely) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. The "no loss" model (where all transitions to are possible except back to N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. The "gain from none" model (where all norms are can emerge from N, but cannot regress) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. The "unstable group" model (where all transitions are possible, except G can only emerge from N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. The "kin-group" model (where all transitions are allowed, expect from K) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Matrilineality will be associated with more instances of reported female reputation (354)Post, Emily R. - Tracking Cross-Cultural Gender Bias in Reputations, 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors examine the effects of social structure, specifically descent and residence, on areas of female reputation. Additionally, they examine the effect of the author's gender on the instances of female reputation included in ethnographic texts.

    Related HypothesesCite