Found 3133 Hypotheses across 314 Pages (0.043 seconds)
  1. Modernization changes in behavior will be positively associated with cultural complexity, suicide, and individual stress (136, 144-5).Divale, William Tulio - Modernization as changes in cultural complexity: new cross-cultural measurements, 2001 - 4 Variables

    This article considers the consequences of modernization. Factor analysis is used to identify four stages of modernization: 1) changes in education, government, and trade; 2) changes in health, technology, and transportation; 3) changes in family, religion, and toilet; and 4) changes in behavior. The authors then consider five trends they expect to be associated with modernization and test whether they develop over the course of the four stages. Results indicate that these 5 trends—increased cultural complexity, female status, pacification, suicide, and social stress—are associated with only the first and fourth stages.

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  2. "Community pattern (archaeologically defined) . . . can help predict [these] sociocultural traits: communal or private real estate, shared or hoarded goods, property at death destroyed or inherited, craftsmen, extent of trade, taxes, coercive power, kin-based community or larger, law, political hierarchy, army, religion or magic, ethical supernatural, complex supernatural, spirits or gods, shamans or priests, religious hierarchy, individual or common ritual, group ceremony frequency, simple or elaborate funerals" (197-200)McNett, Charles W., Jr. - A cross-cultural method for predicting nonmaterial traits in archeology, 1970 - 21 Variables

    "This paper presents an exploratory attempt to solve the problem of how to infer traits for which no direct material evidence remains." The author suggests that the archeologically defined community pattern can predict several sociocultural traits. Results support this hypothesis.

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  3. "Bilateral and cognatic kin . . . are highly indulgent to young children, reject an adult's dependency needs, and furthermore greatly emphasize adult achievement. These conditions seem ideal for the development of a 'child-adult' conflict, and the latter should be reflected, as indeed it is, in a high frequency of drunkenness" (50-51)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  4. ". . . it was predicted that societal drunkenness would be positively related to n Sentience [need for sentient experiences], as expressed in folktales" (79)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  5. "As predicted, simple local communities and simple states (i.e. a low level of political complexity) tended to be associated with a high frequency of drunkenness while complex communities and complex states were related to a lower frequency of drunkenness" (36)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  6. An analysis of interrelated social structure variables revealed that bilateral kinship is relatively the most important predictor of drunkenness (37, 38)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  7. Reputational punishments will be positively correlated with higher sociopolitical complexity, including more external trade, food storage, and more dependence on animal husbandry.Garfield, Zachary H. - Norm violations and punishments across human societies, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This study uses Bayesian phylogenetic regression modelling across 131 largely non-industrial societies to test how variation of punishment is impacted by social, economic, and political organization. The authors focus on the presence of norm violations and types of punishments, and explores their relationships. The norm violations include adultery, rape, religious violations, food violations, and war cowardice. While the types of punishment are reputational, material, physical, or education. This study suggests a hypothesis for each type of punishment in relation to socioecological variables.

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  8. Higher government levels will be associated with several other measures of cultural complexity (203).Barry III, Herbert - Differences between otherwise similar communities reveal cultural linkages w..., 2009 - 9 Variables

    This study examines pairwise differences between similar cultures in order to minimize cultural variation within the SCCS and reveal possible correlates of cultural complexity. Results suggest that one measure of complexity (government above the community level) is significantly associated with several other variables.

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  9. Forager economic type will not be associated with famine threat, percentage of hunting subsistence, presence of gambling, conflict, corporate descent groups, household form, family form, marital form, postmarital residence, female power, male aggression, and male dominance (408, 415, 416).Pryor, Frederic L. - Economic systems of foragers, 2003 - 12 Variables

    This paper investigates five different economic types of foragers: classic, transitional system, politically oriented, economically oriented, and intangibles-oriented. The author asserts that these economic types “are not mere epiphenomena of the oft-discussed social structural or political forces but, rather, are special characteristics that must be independently taken into account” (418). A myriad of environmental, subsistence, political, and social variables are examined: some differed significantly across the five economic types of foragers, but others such as famine threat, conflict, locational fixity, marital form, and postmarital residence did not differ between types.

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  10. Results will not change when controlling for income disparity (GINI) and cultural individualismHarrington, Jesse R. - Culture and National well-being: should societies emphasize freedom or const..., 2015 - 10 Variables

    The purpose of the present study is to provide insight on the debate concerning how best to organize societies: with more freedom (looseness) or with more constraint (tightness). In a comparison of 32 nations, Harrington, Boski, and Gelfand examine the relationship between tightness/looseness and three dimensions of societal well-being: psychosocial, health, and political/economic outcomes. Findings indicate that excessive constraint and/or freedom contribute to poorer psychosocial, health, and economic/political outcomes, as well as overall national-level well-being. These results suggest that a balance of freedom and constraint is associated with optimal societal well-being.

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