Found 4698 Hypotheses across 470 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "There is a rough relationship between type of family system and the subsistence pattern ordered according to productivity and stability: independent family most common in hunting and gathering . . . extended family prevaling where fishing, agriculture dominant . . ." (216-217)Nimkoff, M. F. - Types of family and types of economy, 1960 - 2 Variables

    This article posits that nuclear, independent families are more common under certain economic conditions that affect food supply, demand for family labor, physical mobility, and property system. Empirical analysis suggests that nuclear, independent families are associated with hunting and gathering subsistence type and low social stratification.

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  2. "The extended family is found least often among purely nomadic or migratory bands and is most common among sedentary peoples with a fixed residence" (219)Nimkoff, M. F. - Types of family and types of economy, 1960 - 2 Variables

    This article posits that nuclear, independent families are more common under certain economic conditions that affect food supply, demand for family labor, physical mobility, and property system. Empirical analysis suggests that nuclear, independent families are associated with hunting and gathering subsistence type and low social stratification.

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  3. Subsistence economy and type of family will predict status for the elderly (427)Balkwell, Carolyn - Subsistence economy, family structure and the status of the elderly, 1981 - 3 Variables

    This article explores factors affecting the status of the elderly, looking particularly at type of family, economy, and wealth transfer.

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  4. Foraging economy type (Classic, transitional, human-wealth oriented, intangible-wealth oriented, politically oriented, and physical-wealth oriented) will be associated with certain social structural characteristics (50).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 13 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  5. Subsistence economy, transfer of wealth at marriage and type of family will predict status of the elderly (427)Balkwell, Carolyn - Subsistence economy, family structure and the status of the elderly, 1981 - 4 Variables

    This article explores factors affecting the status of the elderly, looking particularly at type of family, economy, and wealth transfer.

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  6. "…residence is associated with inheritance of property. In patrilocal societies inheritance is largely patrilineal and in matrilocal societies, matrilineal, although in the latter the degree of association is not as high as in the former" (42)Nimkoff, M. F. - Types of family and The social system and the family, 1965 - 2 Variables

    The author uses a world-wide sample of societies to address variation in famiy organization and the economic and social factors to which it relates.

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  7. Extended family will be positively associated with high status of the elderly (425)Balkwell, Carolyn - Subsistence economy, family structure and the status of the elderly, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This article explores factors affecting the status of the elderly, looking particularly at type of family, economy, and wealth transfer.

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  8. Adult levels of foraging productivity are achieved by adolescence for easier to extract resources such as fruit and fish. Pretelli, Ilaria - Foraging complexity and the evolution of childhood, 2022 - 3 Variables

    Why do humans have long childhoods and slow physical growth rates compared to nonhuman primates? The embodied capital theory (ECT) posits that the hard-to-extract, energy-packed resources sought by humans require more complex cognitive and physical skills, which are acquired during a longer development period. The authors of this article test this theory through a comparative analysis of different forms of resource types and skill level by age in 28 different societies. Their findings support ECT, suggesting that long childhoods evolved as a period to develop the skills required for extracting complex resources in foraging societies.

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  9. Peak foraging productivity is attained in adulthood for skill-intensive resources such as tubers and game.Pretelli, Ilaria - Foraging complexity and the evolution of childhood, 2022 - 3 Variables

    Why do humans have long childhoods and slow physical growth rates compared to nonhuman primates? The embodied capital theory (ECT) posits that the hard-to-extract, energy-packed resources sought by humans require more complex cognitive and physical skills, which are acquired during a longer development period. The authors of this article test this theory through a comparative analysis of different forms of resource types and skill level by age in 28 different societies. Their findings support ECT, suggesting that long childhoods evolved as a period to develop the skills required for extracting complex resources in foraging societies.

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  10. "In the absence of clans and of polygamous and extended families, the isolated nuclear family tend to be associated with kinship terminology of the lineal type" (157)Murdock, George Peter - Social structure, 1949 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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