Found 4716 Hypotheses across 472 Pages (0.035 seconds)
  1. Controlling for mode of descent, paternity certainty will be related to inheritance (104).Gray, J. Patrick - A note on brother inheritance, 1982 - 3 Variables

    This article presents a reanalysis of the theory put forth by Hartung (1981) regarding the relationship between inheritance and paternity confidence. The authors take issue with the original sample used and retest the hypothesis.

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  2. Male parental certainty will be positively associated with inheritance of movable property (95, 97).Wolfe, Linda D. - Comment on gaulin and schlegel (1980), 1981 - 2 Variables

    This comment suggests methodological flaws in Gaulin and Schlegel’s (1980) article on male parental certainty and investment practices. The authors take issue with multiple coding decisions and suggest that the findings from the 1980 study ought to be rejected; data does not support a positive association between male parental certainty and investment practices.

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  3. Matrilineal inheritance will be associated with a moderate to low probability of paternity, while patrilineal inheritance will be associated with a high probability of paternity (602).Hartung, John - Matrilineal inheritance: new theory and analysis, 1985 - 2 Variables

    This article provides a new explanation of matrilineal inheritence and paternity certainty, suggesting that matrilineal inheritance is most advantageous for women and can be described as a grandmaternal strategy. Results suggest a strong relationship between matrilineal inheritance and moderate to low probability of paternity, and an even stronger relationship between patrilineal inheritance and high probability of paternity.

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  4. Mode of descent will be related to inheritance practices (104).Gray, J. Patrick - A note on brother inheritance, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a reanalysis of the theory put forth by Hartung (1981) regarding the relationship between inheritance and paternity confidence. The authors take issue with the original sample used and retest the hypothesis.

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  5. "Men stipulate an heir whose relatedness is less affected by low [probability of paternity] in societies where [probability of paternity] is relatively low" (653).Hartung, John - Paternity and inheritance of wealth, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationship between inheritance and paternity certainty. Results indicate an "association between relatively frequent female extramarital sex and a cultural norm that allows men to designate heirs whose relatedness is relatively unaffected by low probability of paternity."

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  6. There will be a higher degree of sexual dimprphism in societies where there is a higher degree of division of labor by sex (576).Wolfe, Linda D. - Subsistence practices and human sexual dimorphism of stature, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the validity of two previous diachronic studies examining the relationship between subsistence strategy and sexual dimorphism of stature with synchronic data. The authors find that neither hypothesis is valid.

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  7. Agricultural societies should exhibit a lower degree of sexual dimorphism than non-agricultural societies (576).Wolfe, Linda D. - Subsistence practices and human sexual dimorphism of stature, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the validity of two previous diachronic studies examining the relationship between subsistence strategy and sexual dimorphism of stature with synchronic data. The authors find that neither hypothesis is valid.

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  8. Female premarital sex is more likely to be restricted in societies that do not allow for extramarital sex.Šaffa, Gabriel - Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  9. Female premarital sex is more likely to be restricted in societies in which children inherit directly from their fathers.Šaffa, Gabriel - Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  10. Greater control of resources by women will be negatvely associated with obedience training for females (p. 313).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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