Found 1919 Hypotheses across 192 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. In correlating descent with prevailing subsistence economy the distribution of cases refutes two evolutionary 19th century assumptions: 1) Matrilineal priority--there was only 1 case in 25 of matrilineal descent among hunter-gatherers 2) unilinear descent during the millenia when men subsisted by food-gathering in absence of agriculture and animal husbandry. 84 percent of hunter-gatherers are characterized by cognatic descent (275)Murdock, George Peter - Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  2. "Complexity of techniques in subsistence economy . . . favors the development of restrictive norms of premarital sex behavior" (402)Murdock, George Peter - Cultural correlates of the regulation of premarital sex behavior, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines the variables that favor restrictive premarital sex norms. Findings indicate that subsistence economy, technology, population size, political integration, belief in a high god, and residence are all correlated with premarital sex norms.

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  3. Patrilineal descent clearly reflects the domenstication of large animals as shown by its occurrence among pastoral societies, as well as by the importance of domesticated animals in the economies of 21 of the 44 agricultural mercantile societies which are patrilineal (275)Murdock, George Peter - Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  4. "Matrilineal descent reaches its highest frequency at the intermediate evolutionary level of incipient agriculture and declines with the rise of food production to a dominant position" (273)Murdock, George Peter - Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  5. "Societies with gathering, hunting, and pastoral economies tend to be nomadic or seminomadic [while societies with fishing, horticulture and agriculture economies tend to be semisedentary or sedentary]" (144)Murdock, George Peter - Correlations of exploitative and settlement patterns, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This study examines relationships between subsistence type, population size, and sedentarism. Hunting, gathering, fishing, and herding societies tend to be smaller than horticultural and agricultural societies. Horticulture, agriculture, and fishing societies tend to be more sedentary.

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  6. "[Size of community is related to subsistence economy]. Local communities tend to be very small in gathering, hunting, pastoral, and fishing societies. . . . Horticulturalists and extensive cereal cultivators occupy . . . larger settlements . . . and intensive agriculturalists [have largest communities]"Murdock, George Peter - Correlations of exploitative and settlement patterns, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This study examines relationships between subsistence type, population size, and sedentarism. Hunting, gathering, fishing, and herding societies tend to be smaller than horticultural and agricultural societies. Horticulture, agriculture, and fishing societies tend to be more sedentary.

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  7. "Where . . . cross cousins of the opposite sex . . . are potential spouses, the behavior patterns exhibited . . . are predominantly those of joking or license, but where marriage [between] them is prohibited the patterns are similar to . . . those prevailing between brother and sister" (368)Murdock, George Peter - Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study re-examines patterns of cross-sex kin relationships using new ethnographic data. The author looks specifically at cross-sex kin relationship in relation to marriage rules.

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  8. "Matrilineal descent is heavily concentrated in the Lower Middle range [of cultural complexity] with only a relatively negligible number of cases at other levels" (391)Murdock, George Peter - Measurement of cultural complexity, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines two measures of cultural complexity: Carneiro’s (1970) scale and codes assembled at the University of Pittsburg. Analysis suggests the two measures are compatible, thus providing evidence for their validity. The authors assess the usefulness of a cultural complexity scale by testing the relationship between descent rules and cultural complexity. Significant associations suggest that cultural complexity is related to social organization and is thereby a useful measure.

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  9. ". . . the degree to which women participate in subsistence activities depends on the compatibility of the latter with child-care responsibilities" (211)Murdock, George Peter - Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysis, 1973 - 9 Variables

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  10. "Patrilineal descent is common throughout the middle and higher levels and is especially prevalent in the Upper Middle range, where its incidence is 73 per cent" (391)Murdock, George Peter - Measurement of cultural complexity, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines two measures of cultural complexity: Carneiro’s (1970) scale and codes assembled at the University of Pittsburg. Analysis suggests the two measures are compatible, thus providing evidence for their validity. The authors assess the usefulness of a cultural complexity scale by testing the relationship between descent rules and cultural complexity. Significant associations suggest that cultural complexity is related to social organization and is thereby a useful measure.

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