Found 3728 Hypotheses across 373 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Female kin (grandmothers and aunts) will provide more direct and indirect care than male kin (grandfathers and uncles) (p. 201).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 3 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  2. Direct and indirect care investments by biologically uncertain kin are positively associated with a society's paternity certainty level (p. 207).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 4 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  3. Direct and indirect care investments by biologically uncertain kin are largest in patrilateral societies (p. 207).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 4 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  4. Brides and their parents are expected to have a greater net gain in resources at the time of marriage than grooms and their parents, respectively (354).Huber, Brad R. - New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactions, 2011 - 1 Variables

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  5. Brides are expected to have a greater net gain in resources at the time of marriage than the brides' parents, and grooms are expected to have a greater net gain in resources than the grooms' parents (354).Huber, Brad R. - New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactions, 2011 - 1 Variables

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  6. Polygyny and patrilaterality are predicted to be positively related to the net number of marriage transactions of brides and their parents and negatively related to the net number of marriage transactions of grooms and their parents (363).Huber, Brad R. - New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactions, 2011 - 3 Variables

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  7. At the time of marriage, wealth is generally transferred from the groom’s family to the bride’s and from the couple’s parents to the bride and groom (288).Huber, Brad R. - Material resource investments at marriage: evolutionary, social, and ecologi..., 2011 - 1 Variables

    This article focuses on parents’ investment of material resources at the time of their child’s marriage. Two patterns emerge from the data: wealth is generally transferred from the groom’s family to the bride’s and from the couple’s parents to the bride and groom. Social and ecological factors are also examined. Multiple regression analysis shows that paternal confidence level, societal polygyny rate, and level of pathogen stress can affect the aforementioned wealth transfer patterns.

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  8. Father-infant proximity is positively associated with marital quality (217)Hendrix, Lewellyn - Quality and equality in marriage: a cross-cultural view, 1997 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a review of the scholarly work relating to marital quality. Cross-cultural testing of various predictors of marital qualtiy are presented singlely as well as multiple regression analyses.

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  9. Sign language will be found in societies more heavily dependent on hunting for basic subsistence (187).Divale, William Tulio - Hunting and the development of sign language: a cross-cultural test, 1977 - 2 Variables

    The association between hunting and sign language is examined. It is hypothesized that sign language develops as a form of nonverbal communication to aid hunters in the coordinated stalking of game. Ethnographic evidence supports this hypothesis. A second hypothesis is also tested concerning the relationship between population size and non-verbal communication, however sampling procedures provided an inadequate test of this hypothesis.

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  10. Sign language will be found in smaller societies whose member are more likely to sustain frequent contacts with members of neighboring societies (188).Divale, William Tulio - Hunting and the development of sign language: a cross-cultural test, 1977 - 2 Variables

    The association between hunting and sign language is examined. It is hypothesized that sign language develops as a form of nonverbal communication to aid hunters in the coordinated stalking of game. Ethnographic evidence supports this hypothesis. A second hypothesis is also tested concerning the relationship between population size and non-verbal communication, however sampling procedures provided an inadequate test of this hypothesis.

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