Found 4542 Hypotheses across 455 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Sexual dimorphism in stature will be associated with variation in the sexual division of labor (27).Holden, Clare - Sexual dimorphism in stature and women's work: a phylogenetic cross-cultural..., 1999 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a phylogenetic approach to studying sexual dimorphism of stature. Results show a significant association between sexual division of labor and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  2. There will be an association between type of subsistence and sexual dimorphism of stature (27).Holden, Clare - Sexual dimorphism in stature and women's work: a phylogenetic cross-cultural..., 1999 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a phylogenetic approach to studying sexual dimorphism of stature. Results show a significant association between sexual division of labor and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  3. Polygyny will be positively associated with sexual dimorphism of stature (225).Wolfe, Linda D. - A cross-cultural investigation into the sexual dimorphism of stature, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This article examines height and sexual dimorphism of stature from a sociobiological perspective. Diet, child rearing, and marriage practices are tested as possible factors contributing to height sexual dimorphism of stature. Results provide some support for a nutritional hypotheses, but sexual selection and parental investment are not statistically significant.

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  4. Polygyny will be associated with greater sexual dimorphism of stature (443).Gray, J. Patrick - Height and sexual dimorphism of stature among human societies, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the relationship between sexual dimorphism of stature and variables of marriage, diet, subsistence and environment. Significant associations were found between security and plentifulness of food supply, protein availability, and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  5. Polygyny will be related to women's ability to control resources (5)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  6. Degree of polygyny will be negatively associated with women's inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  7. The degree of sexual dimorphism of stature will be associated with the degree of polygyny in human societies (434).Alexander, Richard D. - Sexual dimorphisms and breeding systems in pinnipeds, ungulates, primates, a..., 1979 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between sexual dimorphism and degree of polygyny. Authors test this relationship in both humans and non-human species. In non-human species, every correlation between sexual dimorphism (measured by body length) and degree of polygyny was significant. In human populations, sexual dimporhism was not related to degree of polygyny, however, there were some differences between populations with socially imposed monogomy and those with ecologically imposed monogamy.

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  8. Polygyny will be positively related with degree of sexual stature dimorphism (471).Gaulin, Steven JC - Human marriage systems and sexual dimorphism in stature, 1992 - 2 Variables

    The researchers operationalize new measures of Socially Imposed Monogamy (SIM) and Ecologically Imposed Monogamy (EIM) using scores from Murdock's (1986) Ethnographic Atlas in order to reevaluate Alexander et al.'s (1979) findings that sexual stature dimorphism is higher in SIM (monogamous and highly stratified) and polygynous societies compared to EIM (monogamous and egalitarian) ones. The expected associations between marriage system and sexual dimorphism are not robustly significant; however, an interaction effect is discovered between marriage system and stratification with regard to dimorphism.

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  9. There is positive selection for high lactose digestion capacity among adults in populations living in drier environments (615).Holden, Clare - Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults, 1997 - 2 Variables

    The ability of adults to digest lactose is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin, a distribution thought to be a result of genetic adaptation to drinking milk from domestic livestock. Two additional hypotheses have been proposed to explain the distribution of high lactose digestion capacity: (1) supplemental calcium in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin D deficiency and (2) maintenance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly arid environments. However, these hypotheses are confounded by the shared ancestry of populations whose lactose digestion capability has been tested. Therefore, the authors test all three hypotheses using a phylogenetic comparative method for 62 cultures.

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  10. There is positive selection for high lactose digestion capacity among adults in populations living in high-latitude, low-sunshine environments (615).Holden, Clare - Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults, 1997 - 2 Variables

    The ability of adults to digest lactose is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin, a distribution thought to be a result of genetic adaptation to drinking milk from domestic livestock. Two additional hypotheses have been proposed to explain the distribution of high lactose digestion capacity: (1) supplemental calcium in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin D deficiency and (2) maintenance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly arid environments. However, these hypotheses are confounded by the shared ancestry of populations whose lactose digestion capability has been tested. Therefore, the authors test all three hypotheses using a phylogenetic comparative method for 62 cultures.

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