Found 4197 Hypotheses across 420 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "Patrilineal descent is common throughout the middle and higher levels and is especially prevalent in the Upper Middle range, where its incidence is 73 per cent" (391)Murdock, George Peter - Measurement of cultural complexity, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines two measures of cultural complexity: Carneiro’s (1970) scale and codes assembled at the University of Pittsburg. Analysis suggests the two measures are compatible, thus providing evidence for their validity. The authors assess the usefulness of a cultural complexity scale by testing the relationship between descent rules and cultural complexity. Significant associations suggest that cultural complexity is related to social organization and is thereby a useful measure.

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  2. "Bilateral descent strongly predominates at the level of Low Complexity, . . . its incidence declines in the middle ranges, especially sharply at the Upper Middle level, but rises to nearly 50 per cent among the cultures of highest complexity" (391-392)Murdock, George Peter - Measurement of cultural complexity, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines two measures of cultural complexity: Carneiro’s (1970) scale and codes assembled at the University of Pittsburg. Analysis suggests the two measures are compatible, thus providing evidence for their validity. The authors assess the usefulness of a cultural complexity scale by testing the relationship between descent rules and cultural complexity. Significant associations suggest that cultural complexity is related to social organization and is thereby a useful measure.

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  3. "Matrilineal descent is almost invariably found in association with either avunculocal or matrilocal residence, patrilocal residence accompanies patrilineal, ambilineal and double descent, whereas bilateral descent coexists freely with all except avunculocal rule" (273-274)Murdock, George Peter - Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  4. ". . . patrilineal institutions [are] associated with the presence of traits indicative of higher civilization, matrilineal institutions with their absence. [Some of these are:] agriculture, [animal] domestication, writing, pottery, weaving, metals, [labor] specialization, money, [social] classes, government [and] priesthood . . ." (467)Murdock, George Peter - Correlations of matrilineal and patrilineal institutions, 1937 - 12 Variables

    This chapter investigates the various socioeconomic variables that are associated with matrilineal and patrilineal institutions. Several variables were found to correlate significantly with matrilineal and patrilineal institutions.

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  5. "Matrilineal descent reaches its highest frequency at the intermediate evolutionary level of incipient agriculture and declines with the rise of food production to a dominant position" (273)Murdock, George Peter - Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  6. In correlating descent with prevailing subsistence economy the distribution of cases refutes two evolutionary 19th century assumptions: 1) Matrilineal priority--there was only 1 case in 25 of matrilineal descent among hunter-gatherers 2) unilinear descent during the millenia when men subsisted by food-gathering in absence of agriculture and animal husbandry. 84 percent of hunter-gatherers are characterized by cognatic descent (275)Murdock, George Peter - Settlement patterns and community organization: cross-cultural codes 3, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates residence, descent rules, and family structure. Empirical analysis suggests that they are associated with settlement patterns, particularly economic and demographic variables.

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  7. "Matrilineal descent is normally linked with matrilocal residence, patrilineal with patrilocal" (59)Murdock, George Peter - Social structure, 1949 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  8. ". . . marriage and extramarital relations with affinal relatives [in the same consanguineal group as Ego] are . . . prohibited" (310)Murdock, George Peter - Social structure, 1949 - 3 Variables

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  9. "The correlation between sibling terminology of type F (defined by primary distinctions of relative sex) and matrilineal descent is subjected to a chi square test . . . And found reliable" (3, 13)Murdock, George Peter - Patterns of sibling terminology, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines the distribution and diffusion of the seven patterns of sibling classifaction given by the author. The author then studies the association between descent and sibling terminology.

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  10. ". . . a widow is likely to marry the son of her husband by another wife or the son of her husband's brother where descent is patrilineal, or the sister's son of her husband under matrilineal descent. . . . a man [is likely to choose] a close unilinear relative [of his first wife]" (271)Murdock, George Peter - Social structure, 1949 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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