Found 2185 Hypotheses across 219 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Murder in primitive societies will be related to the societal disciplinary practices (735)Lester, David - The relation between discipline experiences and the expression of aggression, 1967 - 2 Variables

    This paper investigates the relationship between discipline experiences in preindustrial societies and aggressive behavior at the societal level. No associations are found between discipline experiences and suicide, murder, aggression resulting from alcohol consumption, or aggression expressed in war-making.

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  2. There will be a "relationship between the incidence or type of suicidal behavior in a society and its disciplinary practices" (734)Lester, David - The relation between discipline experiences and the expression of aggression, 1967 - 2 Variables

    This paper investigates the relationship between discipline experiences in preindustrial societies and aggressive behavior at the societal level. No associations are found between discipline experiences and suicide, murder, aggression resulting from alcohol consumption, or aggression expressed in war-making.

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  3. "The aggressive behaviors of nonliterate societies, as manifested in their suicide and homicide rates… will be inversely associated with love-oriented techniques of discipline" (466).Lester, David - Suicide, homicide, and the effects of socialization, 1967 - 3 Variables

    This study tests for an association between displays of aggression and socialization techniques in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests there is no relationship between discipline techniques and homicidal or suicidal behavior.

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  4. ". . . There is no evidence that mutilation behaviors in primitive societies are related to the incidence of suicide in those societies" (802)Lester, David - Suicide and mutilation behaviors in non-literate societies, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests for a relationship between practices of mutilation and self-torture and the incidence of suicidal behavior in preindustrial, nonliterate societies. Several hypotheses are tested but none supported.

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  5. "Evidence was found for an association between use of love-oriented techniques of punishment and a high fear of death" (229)Lester, David - The fear of death in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  6. Suicide will be associated with major economic activity, rules concerning the expression of emotions, and the importance of pride and shame (197-199, 208).Smith, David Horton - Some social and psychological factors related to suicide in primitive societ..., 1982 - 4 Variables

    This article investigates variables related to suicide in preindustrial societies. Bivariate analyses indicate associations between rates of suicide and religion, kinship, political and economic integration, expression of emotions, and importance of pride. Multiple regression identifies three key predictors of suicide: the major economic activity, rules concerning the expression of emotions, and the importance of pride and shame.

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  7. Militarism or the pursuit of military glory, the second primitive militarism variable, was most strongly related to discipline, sexual repression, narcissism, and cultural development variables (58-60).Eckhardt, William - Primitive militarism, 1975 - 5 Variables

    The reasons "primitive" peoples engaged in warfare are discussed. In order to resolve any inconsistencies in previous studies of warfare, this article looks closely at Textor's (1967) warfare variables and their correlations with other variables included in Textor's (1967) anthropological summary.

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  8. "Frequency of achievement responses in childhood is . . . significantly associated with drinking . . . but curiously enough so is frequency of obedience. . . . The two are unrelated so that each contributes independently and significantly . . . [to] drinking" (67)McClelland, David C. - A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinking, 1972 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  9. "Factor IV, Quantity [of drinking], is primarily weighted on: general consumption, frequency of drinking, procurement effort, extent of problem" (27)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: i. descriptive measurements of drinking..., 1965 - 5 Variables

    Factor analysis is employed to examine variables related to alcohol consumption. Hypotheses related to the integration of drinking, inebriety, aggression while intoxicated, and quantity of drinking are examined.

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  10. A test for association between the suicide rate and fear of death found no supportLester, David - The fear of death in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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