Found 2566 Hypotheses across 257 Pages (0.029 seconds)
  1. The socialization of female children is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males (4).Welch, Michael R. - Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency ..., 1981 - 7 Variables

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  2. Female children will exhibit higher levels of anxiety related to performance of nurturant behavior than will male children (19).Welch, Michael R. - Sex differences in socialization anxiety, 1979 - 2 Variables

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  3. Pressure for obedience to social norms will be positively associated with cultural complexity (206).Zern, David - The use of discipline in socialization: its relationship to cognitive complexity, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between disciplining children and cognitive complexity. 1027 relationships between individual variable pairs are tested, and a significant portion support an association between pressure for obedience to social norms and complexity. Additional socialization variables are considered; gender and age differences are also discussed.

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  4. Females will exhibit higher mean levels of anxiety associated with compliant or obedient patterns of behaviors (19).Welch, Michael R. - Sex differences in socialization anxiety, 1979 - 2 Variables

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  5. Male children will display higher mean levels of anxiety about self-reliance than female children (19).Welch, Michael R. - Sex differences in socialization anxiety, 1979 - 2 Variables

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  6. "Frequency of Theft is also positively correlated with socialization anxiety during the period of childhood with respect to the following areas of training: Responsibility, Self-Reliance, Achievement and Obedience" (296).Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of correlates of crime, 1963 - 5 Variables

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  7. African societies place greater emphasis on the inculcation of independence, self-reliance, and nurturance than do non-African societies (11).Welch, Michael R. - Childhood socialization differences in african and nonafrican societies, 1978 - 7 Variables

    This study compares child socialization emphases in African and non-African societies. Results show that differences in child socialization are neglibible.

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  8. Patrilocality will be positively associated with men's training for obedience (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  9. Mean levels of achievement anxiety will be higher for male than for female children (19).Welch, Michael R. - Sex differences in socialization anxiety, 1979 - 2 Variables

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  10. Greater control of resources by women will be negatvely associated with obedience training for females (p. 313).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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