Found 3932 Hypotheses across 394 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "The probability that any activity will be assigned to males is increased to the extent that it has features which give males a definite advantage, and/or females a definite disadvantage, in its performance, regardless of whether the distinction is innate or socio-cultural" (210-211)Murdock, George Peter - Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysis, 1973 - 12 Variables

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  2. Men will be more likely than women to perform tasks that are early in the production sequence (22).White, Douglas R. - Entailment theory and method: a cross-cultural analysis of the sexual divisi..., 1977 - 1 Variables

    This article discusses constraints on role behavior that affect the division of labor, focusing on women’s childcare responsibilities, the nature of production sequences, and occupational specialization. The authors employ entailment analysis to examine 50 activities; results suggest three findings: 1) men are more likely to be assigned tasks that require travel and exposure to danger, 2) men are more likely to perform tasks that are early in the production sequence, and 3) if women perform a task at an early stage of production, they are more likely to perform subsequent tasks.

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  3. Gender differences in time allocated to food production and play in children/adolescents reflect the proportion of time that adult men and women contribute to food production.Lew-Levy, Sheina - Socioecology shapes child and adolescent time allocation in twelve hunter-ga..., 2022 - 5 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the roles played by children and adolescents in hunter-gatherer societies in relation to their social and ecological context. The authors set out to investigate how environmental factors, ecological risk, and the energetic contributions of adult men and women to food production may have influenced children/adolescent allocation of time to child care, domestic work, food production, and play. In order to carry out this study, the authors logged the behaviors of 690 children and adolescents from twelve hunter-gatherer and mixed-subsistence societies (Agta, Aka, Baka, BaYaka, Dukha, Hadza, Matsi-genka, Maya, Mayangna, Mikea, Pume, and Tsimane), totaling 85,597 unique observations. The study found that harsh environmental factors were not associated with child/adolescent time allocation, but that local ecological risk such as dangerous animals and lack of water availability predicted decreased time allocation to child care and domestic work, and that increased adult female participation in food production was associated with less time invested in child care among boys. It also found that all gendered differences in time allocation among children were stronger when men made greater contributions to food production than women. The authors interpret these results to signify that parents may play a role in preparing their children for environmental and ecological difficulty in order to help them develop skills that will help them become useful community members as adults.

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  4. If women perform a task at an early stage of a production sequence, they will perform all tasks at later stages of the same sequence (22).White, Douglas R. - Entailment theory and method: a cross-cultural analysis of the sexual divisi..., 1977 - 1 Variables

    This article discusses constraints on role behavior that affect the division of labor, focusing on women’s childcare responsibilities, the nature of production sequences, and occupational specialization. The authors employ entailment analysis to examine 50 activities; results suggest three findings: 1) men are more likely to be assigned tasks that require travel and exposure to danger, 2) men are more likely to perform tasks that are early in the production sequence, and 3) if women perform a task at an early stage of production, they are more likely to perform subsequent tasks.

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  5. Men will be more likely to be assigned tasks that require travel and exposure to danger (22).White, Douglas R. - Entailment theory and method: a cross-cultural analysis of the sexual divisi..., 1977 - 1 Variables

    This article discusses constraints on role behavior that affect the division of labor, focusing on women’s childcare responsibilities, the nature of production sequences, and occupational specialization. The authors employ entailment analysis to examine 50 activities; results suggest three findings: 1) men are more likely to be assigned tasks that require travel and exposure to danger, 2) men are more likely to perform tasks that are early in the production sequence, and 3) if women perform a task at an early stage of production, they are more likely to perform subsequent tasks.

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  6. ". . . manufacturing activities tend strongly to be assigned to males when the materials processed are hard or tough . . . but to females when the raw materials are soft or pliable . . ." (211-212)Murdock, George Peter - Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysis, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  7. "With the development of a complex division of labor by occupation, our data reveal a tendency to assign fully specialized tasks to male craftsmen, even in regions where the same activity is ordinarily performed by women in neighboring societies with a less complex economic organization" (213)Murdock, George Peter - Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysis, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  8. Female premarital sex is more likely to be restricted in societies where female contribution to subsistence is low.Šaffa, Gabriel - Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  9. Women's rejection of children will be positively associated with expectations for her to participate in activities that are incompatible with childcare (789).Kitahara, Michio - Women's workload and rejections of children, 1985 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a test of one hypothesis relating women's rejection of children to the labor activities expected of women. The hypothesis is not supported by the data.

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  10. ". . . the sex which uses a product [tends] to be the same as the sex that produces it" (212)Murdock, George Peter - Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysis, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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