Found 2002 Hypotheses across 201 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "Matrilineal systems are relatively more frequent in the 'dominant horticulture' category than either bilateral or patrilineal systems, at high levels of stratification. They are more commonly in the 'dominant horticulture' category than patrilineal systems at low levels; there is no significant difference between matrilineal and bilateral systems at this level" (698)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 3 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  2. [Descent is related] ". . . to stratification. . . . Matrilineal systems tend to have hereditary, rather than complex stratification to a greater degree than . . . patrilineal and bilateral systems" (698)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  3. "Both matrilineal and patrilineal systems tend to cluster at the 'minimal state' level by comparison with bilateral systems, which tend to appear at the extremes of political scope" (684)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  4. "[If political integration is dichotomized into systems with authoritative regulation above the community level and systems at or below the community level] it is possible to see a regular progression among the systems with any agricultural base. As we go from 'plough' agriculture to 'African horticulture,' and thence to 'dominant horticulture' and 'other horticulture,' the percentage of cases at or below the community level rises regularly . . ." (681)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  5. "We would expect matrilineal systems to be more frequent among the non-exogamous communities . . . And rarer among exogamous local untis . . ." (715)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  6. ". . . stratification is closely connected with subsistence type. . . . 'Plough agriculture' shows the highest stratification, 'African horticulture' next, 'dominant horticulture' next, and 'other horticulture' next, in the agricultural series. 'Pastoralism' shows a level intermediate between 'plough agriculture' and 'African horticulture,' somewhat similar to its position in table 17-5. 'New World pastoralism' and 'extraction' bring up the bottom of the list" (694, 698)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  7. "[There is] a highly significant association between lateral succession to the headman's position and matriliny, and lineal succession and patriliny" (707)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  8. Bilateral or ambilineal descent systems are likely to have less complex kinship systems than patrilineal or matrilineal ones (11).Rácz, Péter - Social Practice and Shared History, Not Social Scale, Structure Cross-Cultur..., 2019 - 5 Variables

    Researchers examined kinships terminology systems for explanations regarding specifically observed typology of kin terms for cousins cross-culturally. They explore two theories, the first relating to population size via bottleneck evolution, and the second relating to social practices that shape kinship systems. Using the Ethnographic Atlas within D-PLACE, 936 societies with kinship system information were studied. The findings did not suggest a relationship between increased community size and a decrease in kinship complexity, however the research does suggest a relationship between practices of marriage and descent and kinship complexity.

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  9. Societies with a hunting-gathering subsistence base will be patrilocal and patrilineal (185).Martin, M. Kay - Female of the species, 1975 - 9 Variables

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  10. Agricultural economy type (Herding-Plus, Egalitarian, Individualistic, or Semi-Marketized) will be associated with the presence of certain political institutions. (116)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 15 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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