Found 81 Hypotheses across 9 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Broad supernatural punishments will be positively associated with the evolution of political complexity.Gray, Russell D. - Cultural macroevolution matters, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Researchers sampled 106 Austronesian societies from the Pulotu database to study the way political complexity evolves in relation to religious beliefs and practices. Specifically, they attempt to test the causal theory that supernatural punishment played a causal role in the emergence of large, complex societies. They use phylogenetic models to control for Galton's Problem in testing the supernatural punishment hypothesis in an effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of utilizing cross-cultural datasets in evaluating evolutionary change in human social organization.

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  2. Specific beliefs in moral high gods will be positively associated with the evolution of political complexity.Gray, Russell D. - Cultural macroevolution matters, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Researchers sampled 106 Austronesian societies from the Pulotu database to study the way political complexity evolves in relation to religious beliefs and practices. Specifically, they attempt to test the causal theory that supernatural punishment played a causal role in the emergence of large, complex societies. They use phylogenetic models to control for Galton's Problem in testing the supernatural punishment hypothesis in an effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of utilizing cross-cultural datasets in evaluating evolutionary change in human social organization.

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  3. Social Stratification will be positively associated with the evolution of political complexity.Gray, Russell D. - Cultural macroevolution matters, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Researchers sampled 106 Austronesian societies from the Pulotu database to study the way political complexity evolves in relation to religious beliefs and practices. Specifically, they attempt to test the causal theory that supernatural punishment played a causal role in the emergence of large, complex societies. They use phylogenetic models to control for Galton's Problem in testing the supernatural punishment hypothesis in an effort to demonstrate the effectiveness of utilizing cross-cultural datasets in evaluating evolutionary change in human social organization.

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  4. Phylogenetic modeling indicates strong support for an evolution of land tenure norms in N-I-G-K order (see note).Kushnik, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 1 Variables

    The researchers use phylogenetic methods to map out the evolutionary trajectories of land tenure norms across 97 Austronesian societies. The analysis suggests the relevance of vertical transmission in patterning land tenure norms, rather than horizontal transmission. It also strongly supports a model along a N(none)-I(individual)-G(group)-K(kin) pathway.

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  5. The "exclusivity gain" model (an N-G-K-I trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  6. The "alternative" model (an N-I-G-K trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  7. The "full" model (where all four land tenure norms are transitioned to and from freely) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  8. The "no loss" model (where all transitions to are possible except back to N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  9. The "loss for change model" (where there are free transitions to and from all forms of tenure norms with the stipulation that they pass through N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  10. The "gain from none" model (where all norms are can emerge from N, but cannot regress) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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