Found 848 Documents across 85 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Polygyny: insufficient father-son contact and son's masculine identityKitahara, Michio - Archives of Sexual Behavior, 1976 - 8 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this article is to examine circumcision and segregation of males at puberty. It is suggested that when the son has insufficient contact with his father due to the separation caused by polygynous relationships, the son may develop a feminine personality. The significance of this is compared with the significance of a close mother-son relationship.

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  2. Living quarter arrangements in polygyny and circumcision and segregation of males at pubertyKitahara, Michio - Ethnology, 1974 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between polygynous living quarter arrangements and the presence or absence of circumcision and segregation of males at puberty. The amount of contact between the father and son is also examined as a factor.

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  3. Revisiting status-envy: does the theory hold up?Broude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    Author first tests the validity of the variables traditionallyused in tests of status envy theory. Then the author tests some of the implications of the theory and proposes somewhat different mechanisms.

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  4. Global phylogenetic analysis reveals multiple origins and correlates of genital mutilation/cuttingŠaffa, Gabriel - Nature Human Behavior, 2022 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study is a comprehensive analysis of female and male genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C and MGM/C) practices, including their history and socio-ecological correlates, using a phylogenetic cross-cultural framework. It employed two global ethnographic samples, the Ethnographic Atlas (EA) and the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS), and two subsets of the phylogeny (supertree) of human populations based on genetic and linguistic data, to investigate the variables that may have led to the introduction of these practices, and to determine where and when they may have originated. The study suggests that MGM/C probably originated in polygynous societies with separate residence for co-wives, supporting a mate-guarding function, and that FGM/C likely originated subsequently and almost exclusively in societies already practicing MGM/C, where it may have become a signal of chastity. Both practices are believed to have originated multiple times, some as early as in the mid-Holocene (5,000–7,000 years ago). The study posits that GM/C co-evolves with and may help maintain fundamental social structures and that the high fitness costs of FGM/C are offset by social benefits, such as enhanced marriageability and social capital.

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  5. Male sex role resolutionsMunroe, Robert L. - Handbook of Cross-Cultural Human Development, 1981 - 3 Hypotheses

    This chapter discusses the predictors of the couvade and male circumcision ceremonies cross-culturally. New findings suggest relationships between these two variables and infant carrying practices, marital residence, and descent.

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  6. Significance of the father for the son's masculine identityKitahara, Michio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1975 - 9 Hypotheses

    The significance of the son's insufficient contact with his father during infancy in regard to circumcision and segregation is examined. This article suggests that it is not the long postpartum sexual taboo but the separation of each co-wife that is instrumental in bringing about circumcision and segregation. Expands on Kitahara 1974.

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  7. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study explores why initiation rites for girls are observed in some societies and absent in others. Further, the author seeks to understand cross-cultural variation in the rites.

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  8. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article discusses initiation rites for girls. Specifically explored are the reasons why the ceremonies are observed in some societies and omitted in others and what the variations between societies demonstrates.

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  9. A Cross-cultural Perspective on Upper Palaeolithic Hand Images with Missing PhalangesMcCauley, Brea - Journal of Paleolothic Archaeology, 2018 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors use ethnographic data to try to shed light on the prevalence of missing phalanges in Upper Paleolithic cave images. Searching eHRAF World Cultures, they found evidence of finger amputation in 121 societies. These accounts cast doubt on two common theories: 1) that cave images reflect sign language or 2) counting systems. Researchers argue the intentional removal of fingers could be sorted into the 10 following categories: sacrifice (for deities), mourning (for grief), identity (for group membership), medical (to heal sickness), marriage (status marker), punishment (for deeds), veneration (for worship), offering (post mortem for deities), trophy (an enemies fingers), and talisman (assist with magic). They argue that sacrifice was the most likely reason for the missing finger images in Upper Paleolithic caves.

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  10. Sexual differentiation in socialization and some male genital mutilationsHarrington, Charles - American anthropologist, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study differentiates between circumcision and supercision, two male genital mutilations which are thought to correlate with different gender socialization processes. Results suggest that circumcision occurs in societies with higher sexual differentiation in socialization while supercision occurs in societies with lower sexual differentiation in socialization.

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