Found 897 Documents across 90 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Borrowing versus migration as selection factors in cultural evolutionNaroll, Raoul - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates two mechanisms of cultural evolution: peaceful diffusion and warlike migration. Two societies, one for each mechanism, were compared to a base society on 11 culture traits. Eight of the 11 traits diffused more readily through peaceful borrowing than through warlike migration. The authors conclude that eliminating warlike migration would slow cultural evolution but that peaceful borrowing is a favored mechanism for culture contact and change.

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  2. Legal evolution and societal complexitySchwartz, Richard D. - American Journal of Sociology, 1964 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study explores the relationship between level of legal evolution (measured on a Guttman scale that ranges from just mediation to counsel, police, and mediation) and level of societal complexity. Results suggest a significant association between level of legal evolution and level of societal complexity.

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  3. Legal evolution: one further stepWimberly, Howard - American Journal of Sociology, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    "In an earlier study of the evolution of elements of legal organization, a Guttman scale was developed having as scale steps (elements of legal organization) counsel, police, and mediation. In this study, one further step, that of courts, is discussed, and a new Guttman scale for legal evolution presented."

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  4. Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a new analysisRoss, Marc Howard - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1985 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  5. The nature of exogamy in relation to cross-allegiance/alliance of social unitsKang, Gay Elizabeth - Behavior Science Research, 1979 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests a common theory that predicts a positive relationship between exogamy and cross-allegiances between social units. Results did not support this prediction. Cross-allegiances were only weakly related to cross-cousin marriage.

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  6. Hunter-gatherer economic complexity and “population pressure”: A cross-cultural analysisKeeley, Lawrence H. - Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 1988 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between population pressure and socioeconomic complexity in a cross-cultural sample of hunter-gatherer groups. The author suggests a causal component to the positive correlations found, arguing that increasing population pressure on food resources requires increasing storage dependence, which in turn drives sedentism and other indicators of socioeconomic complexity.

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  7. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  8. Political institutionalization in primitive societies: a hologeistic analysisHill, Kim - Cross-Cultural Research, 1979 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines socio-economic predictors of political complexity. Findings suggest that class stratification is the most significant predictor of political complexity.

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  9. War, peace, and marital residence in pre-industrial societiesDivale, William Tulio - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1976 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article tests a series of hypotheses differentiating internal warfare and external warfare. Results support the theory that internal warfare is a population control mechanism more common in patrilocal societies, whereas external warfare occurs between two societies, one of which recently migrated and adopted matrilocal residence. Based on these findings, the authors assert that internal warfare can be regulated while external warfare cannot.

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  10. Social behaviors associated with hereditary community leadershipBarry III, Herbert - Social Evolution & History, 2005 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the homoarchical custom of hereditary community leadership. Four predictors are identified: (1) permission of premarital heterosexual intercourse by females, (2) small community population, (3) multiple social classes or castes, and (4) praying or violence as a component of community ceremonies. Log linear analysis shows all but the third are significantly associated with hereditary community leadership.

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