Found 758 Documents across 76 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Environmental vs. technological effects on childhood socialization processes: a cross-cultural studyWelch, Michael R. - International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author expands on the findings of Barry, Bacon, and Child (1959), hypothesizing that type of environment is an intervening variable in the relationship between subsistence type and child training. A multiple classification analysis is used.

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  2. Sex differences in socialization anxietyWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1979 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  3. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  4. Socialization anxiety and patterns of economic subsistenceWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines variation in childrens' socialization anxiety across societies of different subsistence types.

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  5. Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspectiveLow, Bobbi S. - Journal of Comparative Psychology, 1989 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  6. Childhood socialization differences in african and nonafrican societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study compares child socialization emphases in African and non-African societies. Results show that differences in child socialization are neglibible.

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  7. Food resource periodicity and cooperation values: a cross-cultural considerationPoggie, Jr., John J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1995 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines socialization for cooperation as a function of economic production. The author theorizes that in societies where large amounts of food production labor must be accomplished quickly, there is a higher cultural value placed on cooperation.

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  8. Supervision and conformity: a cross-cultural analysis of parental socialization valuesEllis, Godfrey J. - The American Journal of Sociology, 1978 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article investigates child socialization toward obedience and conformity as a function of the supervision that parents experience in their own lives. Measures of economic, familial, political, and religious supervision in parents' lives are examined.

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  9. Parental choice: what parents want in a son-in-law and a daughter-in-law across 67 pre-industrial societiesApostolou, Menelaos - British Journal of Psychology, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines differences in parental preference of potential in-laws across cultures. Results suggest that parents look for traits that will benefit themselves and their kin and that gender and subsistence type affects the traits that parents deem most important.

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  10. Making men of them: male socialization for warfare and combative sportsChick, Garry - World Cultures, 2001 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the phenomenon of hypermasculine behavior and a masculine ideology cross-culturally to determine to what degree socialization stimulates this aggressive behavior in some groups and not others.

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