Found 640 Documents across 64 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. A response to broude on the couvadeMunroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologits, 1989 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates determinants of the couvade; the authors reexamine some of their earlier findings and also consider Broude’s (1988) response to their previous studies. Exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements, matrilocal residence, and “protest masculinity” (a concept suggested by Broude) were all found to be associated with the couvade. Father-salience in infancy, also suggested by Broude, was only marginally associated.

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  2. Rethinking the couvade: cross-cultural evidenceBroude, Gwen J. - American Anthropologist, 1988 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines several possible correlates of the couvade. Results suggest that father presence, rather than the expected father absence, is significantly associated with the couvade.

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  3. Explaining male initiation ceremonies: new cross-cultural tests and a catalytic modelEmber, Carol R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article discusses two different explanations of male initiation ceremonies. Evidence is also presented that suggests that psychological conflict might strongly predict male initiation in the presence of the following catalysts: nonmatrilocal residence, nonstate political organization, and warfare.

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  4. Male sex role resolutionsMunroe, Robert L. - Handbook of Cross-Cultural Human Development, 1981 - 3 Hypotheses

    This chapter discusses the predictors of the couvade and male circumcision ceremonies cross-culturally. New findings suggest relationships between these two variables and infant carrying practices, marital residence, and descent.

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  5. Revisiting status-envy: does the theory hold up?Broude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    Author first tests the validity of the variables traditionallyused in tests of status envy theory. Then the author tests some of the implications of the theory and proposes somewhat different mechanisms.

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  6. Effects of climate on certain cultural practicesWhiting, John W.M. - Explorations in Cultural Anthropology: Essays in Honor of George Peter Murdock, 1964 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study explores ecological reasons that might explain why boys are mostly circumcised in tropical regions, particularly in Africa and the insular Pacific. The author postulates a long causal chain linking: 1) tropical climate to the growing of root and fruit crops; 2) the need to keep babies on mother's milk for as long as possible where the adult diet is lacking in protein; 3) a long post-partum sex taboo as a way to space births; 4) the practice of polygyny (and associated mother-child sleeping) in the face of a long sex taboo; 5) patrilocal residence; and 6) male initiation ceremonies which are believed to result from the combination of mother-child sleeping, the long poast-partum sex taboo and patrilocal residence.

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  7. A cross-cultural study of drunkennessDavis, William N. - , 1964 - 18 Hypotheses

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  8. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article discusses initiation rites for girls. Specifically explored are the reasons why the ceremonies are observed in some societies and omitted in others and what the variations between societies demonstrates.

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  9. The function of male initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural test of an alternative hypothesisYoung, Frank W. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates theories of male initiation ceremonies. The author examines a hypothesis related to child-rearing variables (sleeping arrangements and post-partum taboo) and rejects it based on empirical analysis. An alternative hypothesis related to male solidarity is offered.

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  10. The absent father and cross-sex identityBurton, Roger V. - Studies in Adolescence, 1963 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study advances the status envy hypothesis of sex identification to explain customs such as male initiation ceremonies and the couvade. Theory of sex identification is discussed; resource withholding, exclusive mother-child sleeping, patrilocality, father absence, female status, and initiation are all considered. Hypotheses are supported with empirical tests.

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